1. Marcelo
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    Marcelo Contributing Member

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    Studying Art

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Marcelo, Oct 19, 2009.

    Well, when I go to University (Hopefully RISD) I want to study something related with art, the problem is that I can't decide. Why? Because I have heard that jobs in music, writing, drawing and the like tend to be a little unstable... and well, I'm young, and I want to have a stable job with a good pay when I grow up. Any suggestions? I really don't picture myself doing something that isn't art-related when I grow up. :D
     
  2. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    If you could combine your love of art with computer technology, you could major in video game design or digital media or computer graphics--something like that. Or you could combine it with business and major in advertising or marketing.
     
  3. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    Hate to say it, but there's virtually no way you can guarantee a successful career with any arts career (and the greater the 'art' part of the career, the less chance of stability). But, if art-related things are what you are passionate about, then that should be your priority...if you're doing something you love, it will be its own reward or something :D

    I thought that way when I started uni, and I took a BCom....I hated every soul-sucking minute of it, dropped it, and never looked back. You might not make a million doing what you love, but if you love what you do, its worth more than a million.

    And yes, I do realise I sound like a self-help book....
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    since you're just getting started, you don't have to settle on a major for a couple of years and can take both art courses and more 'practical' ones... so don't sweat it now...
     
  5. SonnehLee
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    SonnehLee Contributing Member Contributor

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    On a sort of unrelated note, Maia, you always put the dots at the end of your posts, and it always makes me think "Wait, did I miss something?"


    But she speaks the truth. Take a combination. You could always look at doing a Business/Arts double major type thing.
     
  6. Pallas
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    Pallas Contributing Member Contributor

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    Pause and think, then think some more. As someone who majored in something that I thought would provide me a stable employ, even though I had no great interest in it, all I can say is study something you enjoy, and feel it can best tap your potential.
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    em...

    that's just my idiosyncratic post/email/notes-writing style, nothing more...

    since i'm working with the many writers i mentor all day, every day, along with posting many replies on several writing sites daily, it's evolved over the years i've been doing so, as the easiest/quickest way for me to 'converse'...

    needless to say, i write 'properly' otherwise...

    hugs, m
     
  8. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    I can only say that qualifications in art are no different than many other humanities degrees as far as getting a well-paid job goes.

    I don't know what the situation is where you are, but teaching pays well in the UK and Europe for art-related jobs (specially France). My sister is a retired opera singer and makes a mint from private coaching. My daughter is on the same salary as people years older, teaching design (and selling her own designs from her website as well).

    Most people I know don't only teach--they freelance, or have other projects going on at the same time e.g. organising exhibitions. Teaching also gives you the security, pension rights, holiday pay blah blah blah. The thing to remember is that it's a) essential to get a teaching qualification (for schools) or a PhD, or at least Masters (if you want to rise at a uni). You can travel the world, too, as a teacher if you want, but don't forget (as I did!) to pay the contributions yourself back into the system in your home country (although you'll probably only manage the minimum rate).

    If you can't stand that idea, still get that qualification. When you are older you may wish you had it. Otherwise, like people have said, some kind of combination with a technical subject. Or start your own business. Don't be timid!
     

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