1. SeverinR
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    SeverinR Contributing Member

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    Subject thesaurus

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by SeverinR, Jun 17, 2011.

    1 person likes this.
  2. Laura Mae.
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    Laura Mae. Member

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    I LOVE that website! It's so useful, especially the emotion thesaurus for when I'm sick of writing the typical actions like shrugging and rolling eyes. Get this post stickied, this is a valuable resource for any writer.
     
  3. Ged
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    Ged Senior Member

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    It's really awesome, and it makes you think. But at the same time, interrupting the writing flow just to check for an emotional synonym seems sort of mechanical.
     
  4. Trish
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    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

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    Here's my problem with it. If you need it, it needs to be used responsibly or you're going to end up with the same problems you would with a regular thesarus. What I mean is, looking things up to say "Oh! That's what I was thinking of!" Is completely different than looking things up because "Man, I have no idea what it feels like to cry.." because that's just unrealistic and you're going to get yourself in trouble if you're not careful. For instance looking up "Desperation" you get things like - shaking shoulders, shoulders curling in towards chest (boy would that sound awkward), inconsolable, screaming, moaning, pacing, etc. In those words, if used alone we have anything from grief, fear, being startled, to anger. If you start heaping them on top of each other you're probably going to make it worse.

    There is even grabbing fistfuls of hair at sides of head and dragging nails down cheeks. That's either crazy or crazy grief. I don't know about desperation.

    I think you're better off thinking about how YOU feel in certain situations and going from there. Include thoughts and physical changes (tears, sweating, etc. if applicable) and you'll be much better off.

    EDIT: Also... words like "inconsolable" shouldn't be being used as a description anyway unless it's to say "I tried to help her, but she's inconsolable." As in dialogue only. In narrative you should be showing the person as inconsolable by having people make attempts to console... and failing.
     
  5. LaGs
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    LaGs Banned

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    Somehow, and I don't know why I feel this way, I think this kind of thing robs you of your creativity where you just have this massive database of words sitting beside you that you can look up at any time to describe a different way of saying something.

    It looks really useful though I have to say!
     
  6. dizzyspell
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    dizzyspell Active Member

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    I agree 100% with Trish on this one.
     
  7. psychotick
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    psychotick Contributing Member Contributor

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    Hi,

    That could be useful - he said grabbing fistfulls of hair on the side of his head in appreciation!

    Cheers.
     
  8. Daydream
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    Daydream Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ohhhh! Think I'll be using this too! Thanks a bunch!
     

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