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  1. victo

    victo Active Member

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    sweated, betted, petted

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by victo, Jun 30, 2015.

    Are the following grammatically correct? If not, what are the correct irregular verbs in each?

    He sweated profusely.
    He had sweated profusely.

    He betted on the wrong horse.
    He had betted on the wrong house.

    She petted the dog.
    She had petted the dog.

    Many thanks,

    victo
     
  2. BayView

    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    Bet, not betted.

    The others work as is.
     
  3. victo

    victo Active Member

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    Thank you. 'Sweated', really? Awesome. Now I know.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. izzybot

    izzybot Human Disaster Contributor

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    I'm pretty sure I have seen 'swet' used but I think it's archaic and getting into it would be both pointless and needlessly confusing ... something the English language already needs no help with :D
     
  5. CJT

    CJT Member

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    pet is a regular verb
    infinitive - pet
    simple past - petted
    past participle - pet

    bet is an irregular verb
    infinitive - bet
    simple past - bet
    past participle - bet

    sweat is an exception, as it can be used in either form
    infinitive - sweat
    simple past - sweat/sweated
    past participle - sweat/sweated

    So, the choice is yours on the last one!
     
  6. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Yeah, there is some fluidity in some of these very short, monosyllabic verbs since there is an innate tendency to want to treat them similarly (though not always identically) to strong verbs, even when they aren't. Some have gained a level of either/or-ness, others have not.
     
  7. CJT

    CJT Member

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    That's right, the constant development of the English language includes it's adoption of the 'living' language - I have some OLD grammar books (ex-teacher), and they show many verbs, like these, that were irregular , but are now regular, etc. And dictionary and language based companies - i.e. Cambridge University Press, etc. do studies on the current living language when creating their corpus and materials.
     
  8. CJT

    CJT Member

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    This does mean, of course, that some words I don't really like, have made their way into the various dictionaries, such as gonna, and wanna
    But that's part of the development, and signifies their common use today, which needs to happen if a language is not to stagnate, so I can't complain (apart from this comment, eh? ;)).
     
  9. victo

    victo Active Member

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    Thanks!
     

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