1. julian95
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    julian95 New Member

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    Target Demographic

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by julian95, Jul 10, 2011.

    I really do not know where to post this thread. Sorry...

    The plot for my eventual novel (still structuring the story) is about dreams and such. And here is my problem: I do not know which age group to target my book to.

    Indeed, while this book contains fantasy elements that are recurring in teen/young adult literature, the plot is sometimes rather convoluted and the themes presented are sometimes too serious for teenagers (beyond good and evil, etc.) and this might bore or influence them too much.

    At the same time though I am scared that adults will not take the story very seriously because of the odd plot. While some writers, such as Murakami, can write these adult oriented fantasy books and everyone would read them, I do not have this luxury as a starting writer. Some of you may cite the success of LOTR but that is high fantasy; the setting of my book is in the real world and the imaginary dream world.

    I really do not know in what sort of language should I write the book and this is placing me in as ort of quagmire...
     
  2. Holden
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    Holden Senior Member

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    First off, I wouldn't discount teenagers being able to handle the plot. People don't give teens who read enough credit. I was reading adult-level books when I was twelve, and actually understanding the plot and the deeper meaning behind things.

    Write it as best of you can. Use the tone that is appropriate for the tone of the story. Don't work your writing around your audience. Write the story; the readers will come.
     
  3. Blue_Lotus
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    Blue_Lotus Senior Member

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    I have to agree here I read Tolkin when I was 10 Dante when I was 14... never had any issues understanding the meanings.
    If you write it well the people will find it :) don't worry too much :)
    BL
     
  4. julian95
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    julian95 New Member

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    No, I am not underestimating teenagers' ability to understand complex things. I'm 17 years old and still think myself as a teenager.

    What I mean by that is the sensitivity of the parents regarding the subject... They think that young adults are easily impressionable and that could get me into a lot of trouble.

    I read F451 when I was 11 and managed to finish it (very difficult!).


    QUOTE=Blue_Lotus;796880]I have to agree here I read Tolkin when I was 10 Dante when I was 14... never had any issues understanding the meanings.
    If you write it well the people will find it :) don't worry too much :)
    BL[/QUOTE]
    I've read Dante too when I was 14 :D! Awesome story indeed!
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    what matters is how old the main characters are... that will determine your target market...
     
  6. Phantom_Brainwash
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    Phantom_Brainwash Member

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    Parents will be...

    The thing is, by 14 I was runing around a bookstore completely unsupervised, my mom did nothing more than glance breifly over the back cover and maybe read an inside page. I don't think it's most parents you have to worry about, it's those small town southern parents with nothing better to do but shove their noses where they aren't needed. NO OFFENSE TO SMALL TOWNS OR SOUTHERNERS MEANT!!!! And usually, it's the moms. I mean really, take a look at what you read for school, it's not kept in the YA section, it's kept in the adult books. Anyway, like I said, parents who will complain, small percentage of parents, usually all moms, if you look at their parenting methods, they're typically overbearing and complaining about everything (they're also the ones finding boobs instead of Waldo in their precious Diddy-kinz Where's Waldo books).

    ~Phantom

    Also, high fives if you get my reference. ;)
     
  7. e(g)
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    e(g) Member

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    Personally, I think it's those big city northern parents who pay absolutely no attention to their kids whatsoever that are the problem. NO OFFENSE TO BIG TOWNS OR NORTHERNERS MEANT!!!!



    As someone who works with mentally ill teens, I wouldn't worry so much about the themes of the book. Obviously graphic sex wouldn't be a good idea, nor would something like making a pathologically-based suicide seem heroic or romantic be a good idea.

    But consider the theme of the movie, "Swingblade (with Billy Bob Thorton)." That's a really disturbing theme, the moral of which goes beyond good and evil, and we see in it an illegal but justified first degree murder by the hero. Would that movie be acceptable for teens to watch? Absolutely.

    It would be acceptable because all the actions are committed by a retarded lunatic with a big heart. Therefore, the audience doesn't identify with the MC, but rather the theme of real love, humanity, and self-sacrifice.

    In my opinion it's not so much the theme you present to a YA audience, but rather the moral you express about that theme that matters.

    Can you give us a short synopsis of your book?
     
  8. julian95
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    julian95 New Member

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    Lol, these examples are not the kind of philosophy I meant but rather choices taken beyond human moral ethics.

    A good novel who has this beyond good and evil philosophy is Ishiguro's "never Let me Go" for example.

    Furthermore, as for the graphic sex, I think that you can actually make sex as a moral statement. As much as it is frowned upon, sex in literature is actually a good tool for symbolism. Murakami's "Kafka on the shore" makes great use of sex as a metaphor.

    And "pathologically-based suicide" or murder committed by a semi-retarded lunatic is NOT considered as philosophy or anything at all. Philosophy is acted on a conscious level, not on a natural one.

    Ya, I might post a summary of the story.





    Finally, as for the censorship, it's not the fault of big cities or religious groups. Parents inherently want to keep their children away from all types of harm, whether it'd be physical or psychological.
     

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