1. Phineas Love
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    Phineas Love New Member

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    Telling the Story...

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Phineas Love, Dec 27, 2011.

    I have this story planned out about a psychopath who falls in love. I know exactly how it's going to end, I know what the climax will be, as well as the falling action, and I've written the beginning already, so all the main characters have been introduced and such. Now I'm getting into the thick of things, and I'm losing--confidence, I guess. I'm not sure how much of the story to tell, or even if I'm telling it well.

    Basically, I'm asking for advice about what to write in the rising action. How much fun should I have with this part? How much should I include, and how do I know if I should leave something out? Is it smart to add in sub-plots that I know are there, or to add scenes that develop the characters even if they aren't completely relevant to the outcome of the story?

    Much thanks for any advice. :)
     
  2. Wynnd
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    Wynnd New Member

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    Ah, writer's block! Well the first piece of advice I would have to tell you is that regardless of what information you put in, you should make everything relevant to the outcome of the story. Suspense and thriller stories build up using bits of information that will eventually come together sort of like a puzzle. Put in little events that seem insignificant but arise suspicion in the reader and eventually relate to the climax and ending. :D
     
  3. agentkirb
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    agentkirb Contributing Member

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    Honestly, the best way to do it is to just try stuff out and get feedback from readers. Also reading stories and thinking about what's good (and bad) in the story will give you pointers on what to write yourself. If you haven't written that many stories I wouldn't expect to hit a grand slam on the first try. But if it does kind of come out flat, the key is to know why and think about a way to change it.
     
  4. Marge
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    Marge Member

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    If you’re writing your first draft, feel free to put in whatever comes to mind. Let your ideas take flight and have as much fun with it as you want. Later, when you revise, you can either take out the stuff that doesn’t advance the plot in any way, or find a way to make it all connect. Some situations that you thought unnecessary at first might become vital to the story. And even if they don’t, no harm done. Just cut what you don’t need. Personally, I always find it easier to have too much stuff at the end of a novel than not enough.

    All the best!
     

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