1. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!

    'Thats or that's' grammar question?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Infinitytruth, Apr 6, 2011.

    Hey guys, looking for some answers on the difference between thats and that's, and which one means 'that is.' And what does the other one mean?

    Just a thought that came to mind in the last couple minutes.
     
  2. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    That's is a contraction of that is.
    Thats is not a word.

    That's the difference. :)
     
  3. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    lol, thanks man. :D I saw that on google and I've wrote 'thats' before so I wasn't sure. Also I thought of another one. What is the difference between whats and what's. I mean basically is what's a contraction of 'what is'?
     
  4. KP Williams
    Offline

    KP Williams Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    My place
    Same thing. "What's" is a word, "whats" is not. I'm sure just about any contraction you can think of will fit the same mold.

    The only exception that comes to my mind is its. "Its" is a possessive pronoun, "it's" is a contraction of "it is."
     
    Catrin Lewis and ManOrAstroMan like this.
  5. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    Wow, thank you for the 'its' and 'it's' explanation for sure! That definitely would have been a problem somewhere down the road!

    The apostrophe had me thinking that 'it's' was the possessive pronoun. I think I've made that mistake before! Definitely just learned something!
     
    ManOrAstroMan likes this.
  6. digitig
    Offline

    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    2,502
    Likes Received:
    79
    Location:
    Orpington, Bromley, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    "I feel that there are too many 'thats' in that sentence" :p
     
  7. Omega14
    Offline

    Omega14 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Great Dunmow, Essex, UK
    It's is also a contraction of it has - It's been snowing.
    The simple way to remember it is: if you can't replace it's with it is or it has, then "it's" is wrong and "its" should be used.

    The same goes for who's, which is a contraction of who is or who has. If neither fits, then it should be whose (possessive).

    Rachel
     
  8. bekajoi
    Offline

    bekajoi Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States
    thats = more than one "that"
    that's = that is
    that's = the thing belonging to that (would not be commonly used, but if one were calling a thing "that" instead of using its name, it would work)

    Its = the thing belonging to it, or more than one "it"
    it's = it is/ it has

    Apostrophe s typically indicates ownership. Girl's hat, hat's feather, feather's coloring.
    Adding an s typically indicates multiple objects. girl's hats, hat's feathers, colors upon feathers. Girls hats have feathers
    You can use s' as well, as needed, to indicate ownership. Usually when the last letter of a name/word is s. Harris' hat, Louis' feathers, Paris' colors.
    When ending in s, pluralizing such names (multiple people named Harris) would be done with an "ses" instead of a simple s. Harrises. Louises, Parises. (People named Paris, not multiple cities named Paris, clearly)

    Okay, my brain hurts now. >.<
     
    Ribcracker likes this.
  9. digitig
    Offline

    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    2,502
    Likes Received:
    79
    Location:
    Orpington, Bromley, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    Yep.
    Nope. One girl, many hats: "The girl's hats". Many girls, many hats: "The girls' hats". Girls' hats have feathers.
    Usually only in classical and poetic contexts: Jesus' death, Socrates' teaching. For modern names, 's is usual: Harris's hat, Louis's feathers, Paris's colors. Unless it's the Paris in the story of Helen of Troy.
     
  10. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    So many contradicting rules. Man, the english language is f***** up! :rolleyes:
     
  11. bekajoi
    Offline

    bekajoi Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States
    Indeed. Crazy rules.
     
  12. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    Quick question. What about he's and hes? Is he's a contraction of he is?
     
  13. KP Williams
    Offline

    KP Williams Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    My place
    Yes, I can't think of any other use for he's. Unless there's a guy named He somewhere, in which case you could say something like, "Don't touch that pie! It's He's!"

    If "hes" is an English word, I don't recognize it. But apparently Firefox spell check does, so who knows.
     
  14. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    Thanks dude. Good point.
     
  15. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    A spellcheck program is not a substitute for a good dictionary. Hes is not a word. He's is a contraction for he is.

    There really are not many possessive pronouns you need to worry about. The possessives of the most common pronouns do not use an apostrophe, but others like someone's or anyone's do. You just have to learn them, and not warp your skull trying to figure out why.

    A contraction will always have an apostrophe. Someone's watching. He's creeping up behind you. But I've got your back. It'll be okay.
     
    Catrin Lewis and ManOrAstroMan like this.
  16. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    Yeah, this is a whole new game for me, but I've learned a lot already in the 3 or 4 days I've been here. Just got to keep asking the questions that come up as I write. It's (I almost used 'its' lol) very satisfying being able to use words more confidently when I type. Thank you all for helping me. :) I'd be screwed otherwise.
     
  17. art
    Offline

    art Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,159
    Likes Received:
    113
    Hes,whats, thats etc are certainly words...but they have a very limited application.

    You have too many whats in that sentence. etc
     
  18. Elgaisma
    Offline

    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Messages:
    5,337
    Likes Received:
    92
    I have a lot of hes in my stories due to the amount of male characters I write :) The number of shes is much more manageable.
     
  19. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    Hahahahahahahahaha! That's a very interesting sentence! I can now see how limited a sentence with shes and hes would be, and thank you! Gave me an excellent picture of it all! :)
     
  20. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    What about dog's? Can that be a contraction for dog is? Or how would you say dog is for short if not?
     
  21. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    The dog's outside in the rain (the dog is outside in the rain).
    The dog's dish is empty (the dish belonging to the dog is empty).
     
  22. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    I had a feeling that would be a tricky one.
     
  23. jSewell
    Offline

    jSewell New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Springfield, Missouri
    If you were using the word that in such a sentence, it'd be a possessive pronoun and the apostrophe would be redundant, would it not?
    Its and it's for example -- "its" is a possessive pronoun, therefore has no need for the apostrophe (as well as they could be easily confused)

    While not being necessarily perfect English, it is used.
    Another example:
    We walk down the street thats walls are covered in posters.

    That's what I've learned anyways . . .
     
  24. Infinitytruth
    Offline

    Infinitytruth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    In a house!
    So I don't have to make another thread...new thing I just ran into...can he's be a contraction for 'he has?'
     
  25. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Yes. "He's developed a fever." expands to "He has developed a fever."
     

Share This Page