1. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    the difference?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Cacian, Jan 24, 2012.

    is there much difference between thick and thickle?

    I did look it up but it is not saying much on it.
    would you use them differently?
     
  2. CH878
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    I've not come across 'thickle', not saying it's not a word though, but a quick search on the interweb gives nothing. Do you mean 'fickle'? If so, then yes there is a huge difference.

    Thick means a few things: unintelligent, or it can refer to the physical thickness of something (as in measurements).
    Fickle means you change your mind a lot

    What is your definition of 'thickle'
     
  3. TheComet
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    To my understanding, thick is when two sides of an object are relatively far apart, and thickle is a person that takes a long time to understand something...

    TheComet
     
  4. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    Around here, 'thick' and 'thickle' can both mean being slow to understand. Using thick in that way is slang.
     
  5. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    This, according to the urban dictionary, which is the same as 'thick'.
    ''someone who is slow and doesnt understand whats going on''
     
  6. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    that's right but thick also means slow

    and ''thickle'' for slang instead?
     
  7. CH878
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    CH878 Active Member

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    It'll be slang then, it's certainly non standard. Where I live, 'thickle' isn't a word that's widely used, if at all. If you want your writing to be realistic then it might be worth doing a bit of research into what areas this word is used in, and not all readers might understand what it means.

    In short:
    Thick: standard
    Thickle: slang (regional) and non-standard

    Both mean, as far as I can see, someone who is intellectually impaired, basically.
     
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  8. Cacian
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    I live in London I have heard it said many times but I get it confused with ''fickle'' in sound sometimes.
    which part of England are you from?
     
  9. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    We use thick. I'd never heard of thickle before this - had to look it up and, like others, only found it in the Urban Dictionary (which most likely means it's also slang). Thickle is certainly not a 'word' I would use.
     
  10. CH878
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    CH878 Active Member

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    I'm from the North of England, and I've not heard it said ever, certainly not amongst my age group (young adults). It's probably a regional thing, that's one of the things I love about the English language, the huge variations in the dialects used in different areas.
     
  11. SeverinR
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    SeverinR Contributing Member

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    I would say (ie IMHO) thickle would only be used by someone writing in the area that uses the word, the character would use it, the author would use a word more common to the average reader.
     

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