1. jonblonde
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    jonblonde Member

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    The Hardest Part About Writing A Story ...

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by jonblonde, Aug 16, 2016.

    In your opinion, what do you gals / guys think is the most formidable O challenges pertaining to the writing process?
     
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  2. Nightstar99
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    Nightstar99 Contributing Member

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    Just sticking at it I think.
     
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  3. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'd go along with that, @Nightstar99.
     
  4. jonblonde
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    jonblonde Member

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    Does it have to do with finding the inspiration to continue writing? If so, is it the constant / overwhelming challenges that you as a writer are faced with?
     
  5. Spencer1990
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    Spencer1990 Contributing Member

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    For me, it's starting a story. Sitting down to actually write is usually the toughest part. Once I've a sentence down, it starts to flow pretty well.
     
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  6. Zorg
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    Zorg Member

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    One thing I've found difficult is some of the research involved. A particular 'psychology' I've given a character is either a) not fashionable (which tends to make him/her either unlikeable or an anachronistic when it wasn't the intention) or b) completely wrong, in which case I have to reassess the character again. But I will go along with the others here and declare that just sitting down and doing it is daunting.
     
  7. Romana
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    Romana Member

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    getting from one plot point to another.
    scenes are easy, but connecting them is so hard
     
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  8. jonblonde
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    jonblonde Member

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    do you tend to write lots of short stories? or rather, for you personally, is it maybe coming up with the idea that sparks the "conception of the story" so to speak? if so, when the idea comes, will you typically get to sitting down and writing at length?
     
  9. jonblonde
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    jonblonde Member

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    but what is it about the connecting process? for you, is it a matter of finding parallels between the elements / ideas of a story? what kind of stories do you like to write?
     
  10. jonblonde
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    jonblonde Member

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    do you always define the characters' psychologies? (do most writers do this?) should writers really be on something akin to a personal basis with the characters they create?
     
  11. VenomHawkings
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    VenomHawkings New Member

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    I'm generally booming with ideas (which can cause some problems if I'm already working one out and a better idea pops up), but that's not the hardest part for me. It's describing what I envision in a way that others understand.
     
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  12. izzybot
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    izzybot Human Disaster Contributor

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    It's self-doubt, for me. Strangely, I have a hard time writing when all I can think is "this is garbage, what am I doing" :rolleyes: Other problems have defined solutions that I've been writing long enough to have figured out, but I got nothin' for getting past that one.

    I do, but then I'm also interested in and study psychology (and play with psychological themes in most of my writing), so it would be weird for me not to. I don't think it's necessary for everyone.
     
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  13. Lyrical
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    Lyrical Frumious Bandersnatch

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    Yep, I'm with izzybot on this one. I get excited about an idea and go along with it, having fun, until at a certain point some serious self-doubt hits me like a wall. It's as if a voice inside me starts to whisper, "This is junk. You're junk. You're wasting your time."
    Pushing past that and writing anyway is, hands down, 100%, the hardest part for me.
     
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  14. Spencer1990
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    Spencer1990 Contributing Member

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    That's what it is for me except it comes before I even start. I have an idea that I think is good, then I wait too long to sit down and write because I'm working, doing homework, parenting, being a good husband, cooking, etc and in between the idea and the sitting down, the voice creeps in with "you're wasting your time. You're don't write well enough to frame this story properly. You don't even have an opening line."
     
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  15. Zorg
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    Zorg Member

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    I do and I don't. I have a habit of wanting to flesh out only my main characters so that they're relatable to the reader as someone who could exist and who makes his/her decisions based on how he/she thinks. An issue I'm dealing with right now is a character making an observation about the acting profession. His POV is that it's all BS but I want him to articulate it in a way to which there's no question about it.
     
  16. Cave Troll
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    Cave Troll Bite the bullet, do your own thing. Contributor

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    Writers block. More of problem for those that write off the cuff, and not so much for those that outline in advance.
     
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  17. Malisky
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    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    The one's I liked in the topic and furthermore getting the brain frequency right in order to write and being inspired at the same time. Because I might write a lot but I also delete and re-write a lot in order to bring this "first" mood in which inspired me to do so. Because it's a different mindset when I'm only using my brain, day-dreaming of my story and a different when I'm also using my hands to translate it into something communicative as clearly as I see it. I feel kind of stupid when I'm having this block because the way I see it, it's like getting confused while you are pacing just because you are chewing a bubblegum. Recently though, I've realized that this happens only when I set the bar too high and take my writing too seriously. Maybe, next time I'll try not to take it too seriously and let it flow without having specific demands out of the results. It's good not to overthink things.

    Another thing is time. Too much precious time.
     
  18. Lifeline
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    Lifeline The Dark - not in Wonderland Supporter Contributor

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    My bane are transitions within a scene, when i.e. the location changes or my characters simply walk somewhere else. To get from one friction point to the next without interrupting the flow of the scene.

    Connecting scenes is easier by contrast, the reader expects a break there to a degree. It is only a matter of knitting them together.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016
  19. vera
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    vera New Member

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    Well for me, i found a professional writer that ease my work, and she is really good, super fast delivery online and does almost anything pertaining writing, i have never been happier. You can try her out. Contact me for details.
     
  20. Siena
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    Siena Active Member

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    Probably the actual sitting down and doing it. Especially when the financial motivation is at the tail end.
     
  21. OurJud
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    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    Pacing and the passing of time.

    They (them bastards again) say don't use padding or filling, but I've never quite understood how scenes and plot points are linked together without doing this. The characters in your novel can't just simply fall from one mishap to another - it would be too relentless, let alone unrealistic, and yet I've never figured out how to bridge these gaps with 'down time' that wouldn't be considered filler.

    This is why my novels don't have a plot.

    I also find it very difficult not to confuse the passing of time in my writing, to the real passing of time. In other words if I've spent six months on a story, I feel like my characters have been on their adventure for six months too, when in fact the story may only cover a couple of weeks.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016
  22. big soft moose
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    big soft moose Active Member

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    making the words in my head come out n the page ... i get to the point where ive told myself the whole story in my head, revised it several times and then it all goes to hell when I start writing it down... I eventually realised that this is because its a lot richer in my minds eye as my imagination fills in a lot of description and context which i need to put into words to make a scene work
     
  23. MarcT
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    MarcT Member

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    My first book was autobiographical and was set to a rolling chronology which was easy write because I didn't have to dig very deep at all.
    This time, being fiction, it's more of a challenge.
    The beginning is covered and will be looped back to at the end of the book and the middle is where I am now. The end I have tucked away in a box in my head and go there from time to time.
    As someone else mentioned, the seamless joining of events and plotlines within the book can be daunting, but I'm hoping that the more I write I'll intuitively bring the jigsaw pieces together.
    That's the plan anyway.
     
  24. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    For me, it depends on the story. Usually, my problem is pacing and managing the climax. I'm working on a story right now, though, in which the main problem is finding the beginning. I've tried starting it in about a half a dozen places so far, and none of them are quite right. I'll get it eventually, but it's a bit frustrating at the moment.
     
  25. big soft moose
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    big soft moose Active Member

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    yeah i feel your pain on that - i'm on my third beginning for 'after the wave' ... originally I started with a prologue a long way into the story ut that felt too far , then I moved to starting with some scene setting via the MC talking to new recruits but that felt too info dumpy despite having a nice laconic tone of voice going on, so currently i'm starting with the 'blow job interrupted by RPG fire" scene but I've some concerns about having explicit sexual content and explicit violence in the first couple of pages... as you say its frustrating, but i'm sure it will come good in the end

    another hard/annoying part is where I write some 'killer' dialogue then discover on re edit that I've subconsciously lifted it from another book or TV show ... like for instance I wrote a scene yesterday where my guys are deep in enemy territory and one of them is expressing doubts about going into action when the odds are so bad, and I had my MC tell him "we're recon, we're supposed to be surrounded and outgunned" .. only to discover today that that's from episode 6 of Band of Brothers (the battle of the bulge) where Winters tells his men "we're the airbourne , we're supposed to be surrounded" sigh...
     
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