1. Funny Bunny
    Offline

    Funny Bunny Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    6

    The "Other Perks" to being Published

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Funny Bunny, Oct 4, 2007.

    Here is more incentive to finish your book and publish:

    All I hear is that "you will not become rich" as a novelist (or books in general). Well, I have been looking up the non-monetary payment for having a published book (not necessarily self published). I've been thinking of this for a long time. Writing novels actually is not a dead end street with only "writing novels" at the beginning and end. Writing and publishing can lead to a career, not necessarily as mundane as writing yet another romance novel. These are Other Perks that you may not have thought of, and will need to hunt down and discover on your own. I am sure there are many more. If anyone knows of any others, please feel free to post them here.

    Although many (most) novelists are not "Rich or Famous" there are other "perks" to being a published author that I don't hear much about:

    At least some money. A lot of people say you will not get rich. I actually don't know how much or little money you make, if anything, but any money is better than none. Money is a great incentive (for me anyway).

    Acceptance into the more exclusive on-line writing groups and creative writing workshops where you can meet more authors, agents and publisher reps. (If you have been looking at them, some are for actual professional novelists This has to do with the fact that you should not post on line large chunks of your novel--Many are only for professional writers).

    Ability to join the writers guild as a professional (they have insurance) and also contacts to get farther in your career. The writer's guild and so on are professional organizations.

    Easier entrance into BFA/MFA programs (and a little money for education), and some really good, polished portfolio pieces that will impress most anyone.

    Sometimes there is Grant Money available to people who have written and published a book.

    Be treated with seriousness when you try to sell a script or some other effort.

    An MFA (even a BFA in some cases) can lead to a job teaching creative writing at "community college" level. (fairly good money).

    It can also lead to getting a "writing job" for example Editor of an Alumni Magazine (not to sneeze at, better than factory work.) Or even corporate newsletter writer. I know it doesn't sound like much but they are full time jobs, usually pay decently, and will allow you to work doing a writing job and write novels at the same time. (Usually you will need some sort of Writing/journalism degree for this as well).

    As a Professional novelist, you can deduct your business expenses on taxes, that means your education costs, your office costs, your groups and professional organizations, even your research and trips, I am sure also self publishing costs. (You would have to check the specifics with your tax laws).

    Meet chicks! Or Guys, whatever. Everyone thinks writers live a glamorous life (hah!) fool them all!

    FB :eek:
     
  2. Weaselword
    Offline

    Weaselword Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    5
    It varies quite a lot, but to give you a ballpark, on my first sale I made about £3,000 from a ~60,000 word manuscript.

    I know writers who work for two pence a word, and writers who work for nothing.

    I wouldn't rate any of the other benefits you mention particularly highly (I love the idea of getting a grant to write, but I've never heard of such a thing happening to anyone I could actually name)--but there's one important one.

    That feeling when you look at a book on your bookshelf with your name on the spine. Or the first time you walk into a bookshop and see your title on the shelves. That's better than drugs.
     
  3. Funny Bunny
    Offline

    Funny Bunny Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    6
    Yes, I know authors who have made 2-3000 dollars, probably 5000 these days (u.s.) It is nice for a fun part time job.

    There are ways to use the fact you are published to further your career in other ways.



    Thanks! FB
     
  4. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    I would also like to point out that most professional jobs outside the literary fields, including but not limited to Engineering positions, actively seek candidates who can communicate effectively. Being able to add "Published author" to a resume certainly adds supporting evidence to the phrase "effective communicator" that nearly everyone puts into a resume these days.

    Anyone who has read more than one Project Proposal or a Requirements Document can fully appreciate just how poorly most managers and staff communicate in writing. It isn't merely a lack of clarity in a complicated plan. It is also a matter of composing a grammatically correct, readable sentence, much less building paragraphs.

    Technical writing is different from creative writing, but even elements common to both are woefully rare.
     

Share This Page