1. gaspode
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    gaspode New Member

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    The word "awash" and it's meaning

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by gaspode, Oct 12, 2012.

    Hello,

    First of all, English is not my first language. I try to use google and online dictionaries but I haven't found an answer to this.

    If I for example would like to describe an animal carcass that is covered in flies, would this be a correct use of the word "awash":

    "The dead deer was awash in black flies."

    What I want to express in this case is a metaphor to waves coming to shore to indicate how the flies moved, that they will leave the carcass when they are done so to speak, and so on. Much like a wave. Would this then be correct? If not I would be very happy if someone could give similar constructs that I could use instead!

    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i'm not sure that word will do all you want it to... perhaps something like this would work better:

    the dead deer was alive with waves of black flies...
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    One word alone does not a metaphor make.
     
  4. gaspode
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    gaspode New Member

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    Thank you for your answers! I'm sorry that I was unclear but this was just an example, of course I would have to write a more detailed description to get all that information across. The question was if I can use this word in this way as a "start".
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i wouldn't advise it...
     
  6. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    "Awash" is used figuratively in English to mean "flooded with", "covered with" and so on. So your sentence is correct, I just don't think it's a particularly good metaphor in this case. Mamma's suggestion is better. Personally I'd probably write "Waves of flies swarmed over the dead deer."
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    with that, 'waves' and 'swarmed' don't gibe well, since a 'wave' can't 'swarm'...
     
  8. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    It's not just water that can form waves! Flies can form into waves of flies, and the waves can move in large numbers (one definition of "swarm"), so I reckon waves of flies can swarm.
     
  9. JJ_Maxx
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    JJ_Maxx Banned

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    I think 'awash' is similar to 'bathed'... as in:

    Anyways, yeah like, 'bathed in light'. I think awash means more covered than flies could be on a dead carcass.

    I like swarmed. I also like cloud, too.

    Such as:

    Good luck!

    J. J.
     
  10. gaspode
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    gaspode New Member

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    Thank you for your suggestions everyone! Really helpful.
     

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