1. Cacian
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    the word 'fit'?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Cacian, Nov 20, 2011.

    can you use the word FIT in this context:

    for example can you say:

    Is Blackadder fit or fixed?
    meaning is it true to life or is it made up?
    you can say this personne is fit as in attractive but can you refer to a concept as fit is the question.
     
  2. Gannon
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    Gannon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Out of context it doesn't make much sense. If you provide the relevant contest ahead of time to frame the question, then there is no reason it can't work.
     
  3. SnappyUK
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    I've never heard the word 'fit' used on its own with this meaning. There is a phrase 'fit for purpose', which describes something that is suitable for the role in which it is employed. Similarly, the use of 'fixed' for 'made up' is one I'm unfamiliar with. As Gannon has said, the context needs to be established in advance if you intend to use this structure.
     
  4. Cacian
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    you have heard of the word FIT as in attractive right?
    I do know about the expression 'fit for purpose' thank you for reminding me.
    the word FIXED as in something is fixed as plotted without the consent or the knowldge of someone.
    for example:
    you could say 'Blind Date' is fixed as in the contestants have been chosen for this particular show to get them to meet each other.
    or you can say someone has been fixed to meet someone through friends.
    so I thought if somethingcan be 'fixed to do or become something' then 'fit' can also be used in the same way.
     
  5. FoxPaw
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    FoxPaw Senior Member

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    She's using "fixed" as in something is rigged in that sense. Like if an underground boxing match is rigged or "fixed."
     
  6. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    sorry, but 'fit' just doesn't work at all as an antonym for 'fixed' as in 'rigged'... what you really seem to mean there is 'legit/legitimate' or 'honest' or 'for real'... and so on...

    'fit' can mean 'healthy/suitable/ready/qualified/proper' when used as an adjective... and in the context of being the opposite of something that may be 'rigged' none of those make good sense...
     
  7. Cacian
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    but you can say something is fit for purpose right?
     
  8. Cacian
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    that's right so FIT would do the exact opposite as in genuine?!
     
  9. Dante Dases
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    Dante Dases Contributing Member Contributor

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    Nicked shamelessly from my computer's in-built Oxford Dictionary:

    Fit |fit|

    adjective ( fitter , fittest )

    1 [ predic. ] (of a thing) of a suitable quality, standard, or type to meet the required purpose : the meat is fit for human consumption | [with infinitive ] is the water clean and fit to drink?

    • (of a person) having the requisite qualities or skills to undertake something competently : he felt himself quite fit for battle | [with infinitive ] Ted was ghastly pale and fit to do no more than switch channels.

    • Biology possessing or conferring the ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment : survival of the fittest.

    • suitable and correct according to accepted social standards : a fit subject on which to correspond.

    • [with infinitive ] informal (of a person or thing) having reached such an extreme condition as to be on the point of doing the thing specified : he baited even his close companions until they were fit to kill him.

    • informal ready : well, are you fit?

    2 in good health, esp. because of regular physical exercise : I swim regularly to keep fit | figurative the measures would ensure a leaner, fitter company.

    • Brit., informal sexually attractive; good-looking.

    verb ( fitted or fit |fit|, fitting ) [ trans. ]

    1 be of the right shape and size for : those jeans still fit me | [ intrans. ] the shoes fit better after being stretched.

    • (usu. be fitted for) try clothing on (someone) in order to make or alter it to the correct size : she was about to be fitted for her costume.

    • [ intrans. ] be of the right size, shape, or number to occupy a particular position or place : Angela says we can all fit in her car.

    2 fix or put (something) into place : they fitted smoke alarms to their home.

    • (often be fitted with) provide (something) with a particular component or article : most tools can be fitted with a new handle.

    • join or cause to join together to form a whole : [ intrans. ] it took a while to figure out how the confounded things fit together | [ trans. ] many physicists tried to fit together the various pieces of the puzzle.

    3 be in agreement or harmony with; match : the punishment should fit the crime.

    • (of an attribute, qualification, or skill) make (someone) suitable to fulfill a particular role or undertake a particular task : an MS fits the student for a professional career.

    noun

    the particular way in which something, esp. a garment or component, fits around or into something : the dress was a perfect fit.

    • the particular way in which a thing matches something else : a close fit between teachers' qualifications and their teaching responsibilities.

    • Statistics the correspondence between observed data and the values expected by theory.

    PHRASES

    ( as) fit as a fiddle see fiddle .

    fit the bill see bill 1 .

    fit like a glove see glove .

    fit to be tied informal very angry : Daddy was fit to be tied when I separated from Hugh.

    fit to bust informal with great energy : they laughed fit to bust.

    see (or think) fit consider it correct or acceptable to do something : why did the company see fit to give you the job?

    PHRASAL VERBS

    fit in (of a person) be socially compatible with other members of a group : he feels he should become tough to fit in with his friends. • (of a thing) be in harmony with other things within a larger structure : produce ideas that fit in with an established approach. • (also fit into) (of a person or thing) constitute part of a particular situation or larger structure : where do your sisters fit in?

    fit someone/something in (or into) find room or have sufficient space for someone or something : can you fit any more books into the box? • succeed in finding time in a busy schedule to see someone or do something : you're never too busy to fit exercise into your life.

    fit someone/something out (or up) provide with the necessary equipment, supplies, clothes, or other items for a particular situation : the cabin had been fitted out to a high standard.

    fit someone up Brit., informal incriminate someone by falsifying evidence against them.

    fit something on Brit. try on (a garment).

    DERIVATIVES

    fitly |ˈfitlē| adverb

    ORIGIN late Middle English : of unknown origin.

    fit 2

    noun

    a sudden uncontrollable outbreak of intense emotion, laughter, coughing, or other action or activity : in a fit of temper | he got coughing fits.

    • a sudden attack of convulsions and/or loss of consciousness, typical of epilepsy and some other medical conditions : he thought she was having a fit.

    PHRASES

    have (or throw) a fit informal be very surprised or angry : my mother would have a fit if she heard that.

    in fits ( of laughter) informal highly amused : he had us all in fits.

    in (or by) fits and starts with irregular bursts of activity : the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts.

    ORIGIN Old English fitt [conflict,] in Middle English ‘position of danger or excitement,’ also [short period] ; the sense [sudden attack of illness] dates from the mid 16th cent.

    fit 3 (also fytte)

    noun archaic

    a section of a poem.

    ORIGIN Old English fitt, perhaps the same word as fit 2 , or related to German Fitze ‘skein of yarn,’ in the obsolete sense [thread with which weavers mark off a day's work.]
     
  10. Cacian
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    interesting word FITZ.
    Anglo_Norman and means illegitimate ''son of ''
    In later times, similar forms were coined for members of the English and British royal family, who historically lacked a surname, and particularly for illegitimate children of kings and princes (Fitzroy, son of the king; Fitzjames, son of the king James II of England; and FitzClarence, son of the Duke of Clarence). From this later use, it has been inferred that the name indicates illegitimacy, which was not originally the case.
     
  11. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    'fit for purpose' makes no sense...

    no... how can 'fit' be the opposite of 'genuine'?
     
  12. Cacian
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    I meant fit could mean genuine sorry.
     
  13. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    fit = suitable (not genuine)
    fit = attractive/sexy (slang)
    fit and proper = the right thing to do/the right concept/idea (in a moral sense)
    a person is not usually 'fixed'. It sounds like a woman who's had an abortion or something, I'd be careful how you use it.
     
  14. digitig
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    Why on Earth not? It makes perfect sense to me -- and to UK legislators, because UK consumer legislation requires that goods sold be fit for purpose.
     
  15. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ditto this!
     
  16. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    that seems to be ok in the uk, but for american english, it makes little to no sense... we'd say 'fit for a [or 'the'] purpose'...
     

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