1. CobaltLion
    Offline

    CobaltLion Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Atlanta

    Thinking in paragraphs

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by CobaltLion, Aug 26, 2008.

    I'm wiriting a section in which the carachter narrating the section is having deeper thoughts that "interrupt" his dialogue, many times in mid sentance, as they are supposed to be occouring at the same time as the narrative.

    I've been placing them inside parenthesis and italics (I italicize all thoughts from characters to differentiate them from spoken dialogue. Do these start a new paragraph, even if they interupt a sentace, or should they be on the same line as the dialgue that started them?

    Examples:

    Like this--

    Or this-

     
  2. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    I would paragraph it like this:
    The first break separates the focus on him and his shout from your run. The next separates the present action, your run, from a past event.

    A good way to approach it is to ask yourself, "What is this paragraph about?" If the answer containe "and" or "then", you might need to subdivide it. It's not a 100% rule, but it's a good starting point.
     
  3. NaCl
    Offline

    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,855
    Likes Received:
    58
    Ditto Cog's advice . . . if this is an example of your overall writing in this story, you need to go back and study your paragraph breaks, following Cog's comment about separating different topics into their own paragraphs.
     
  4. CobaltLion
    Offline

    CobaltLion Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Alright, thanks.

    This isn't really typical of how I write, but I'm doing this in one particular section to try and subtaly illustrate a point that occours later one. (That the character has gaps in his memory.)

    I've got the breaks in there already, and based off that advice I'm going to be better off removing a few of these "thought bubbles." that interupt sentances and the overall flow of the paragraph.

    If it makes more sense I could include a larger section. (2 or 3 paragraphs) to ilustrate.
     
  5. architectus
    Offline

    architectus Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,796
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Ca
    Check out Stephen King's, The Shinning. He does this a lot in that novel.
     
  6. apathykills
    Offline

    apathykills Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    israel
    after reading this i have a question, i noticed that in all your examples you leave a space between each paragraph.
    personally i begin new paragraphs without using a blank line (as I am doing now) and only start a completely new block of text in case of something akin to a change in location, point of view, pace etc...
    is this a major grammatical mistake or an acceptable personal preference?
     
  7. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    In manuscript, paragraphs should begin with a first line indent, typically around hald an inch. Everyhing in a manuscript is double spaced, but no extra blank line shoubd be placed between paragraphs.

    Leading indents don't work in the text boxes on this website. Instead, you should manually put extra blank lines between paragraphs when posting work here. The same method is usable on web pages, if you don't have first line indent available. Many printed media use both a first line indent and an vertical gap between paragraphs, and that's very readable.

    But treat all paragraphs the same way in a single written piece. Sections or scenes may be separated with a "paragraph" consisting of "###" in manuscript or in the forum. On a typeset page you might use a centered graphic such as a scroll curve.
     

Share This Page