1. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    To Borrow and to lend?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Cacian, Dec 15, 2011.

    1) which is better to use?

    he lend him some money because he needed to pay off /settle his balance.


    Or



    He borrowed some money from him because he needed it.

    2) which would you use in real term?
     
  2. Cacian
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  3. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    To loan is to give something to someone temporarily.

    To borrow is to receive something from someone temporarily.

    Hence your example "Can you borrow me a pen?" is incorrect, and should be "Can you lend me a pen?". Alternatively, it could be "Can I borrow a pen?" as borrowing is what the person asking does, and lending is what the person being asked does.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    yup!... study what banzai said...

    btw, borrow and lend/loan are antonyms...
     
  5. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    antonyms are opposites like
    fas and slow
    how is borrow an antonym of lend.
    They mean the same only the actions are reversed.
    To loan is more official because there is an interest/money in it.
    So I would say they are synonyms non?
     
  6. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    No. The actions, as you stated, are reversed - opposite of each other. Antonyms.
     
  7. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    This is taken from Google

     
  8. AmsterdamAssassin
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    AmsterdamAssassin Contributing Member

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    Google is not a dictionary.

    "Neither a borrower nor a lender be."

    'Can you borrow me a pen' is impossible. 'Can I borrow your pen?' Or, 'Can you lend me your pen?'

    Loan as a verb is a recent development, like nauseous [causing nausea] and nauseated [feeling nausea] can now be both be used for feeling nausea. To me, it sounds strange and I prefer, 'Can you lend me your pen', to 'Can you loan me your pen?', and 'I'm nauseated' to 'I'm nauseous'.
     
  9. Cacian
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    would you agree that to loan in this context in not correct because loan implies interest as in a bank loan and therefore should only be used to refer money with interest.?
     
  10. Ettina
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    No, I don't think it implies that at all.
     
  11. Allan Paas
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    Allan Paas Contributing Member

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    Basically, borrow means take, and lend means give.

    Give and take are antonyms, so are borrow and lend.
     
  12. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    If you loan something, you're giving. If you borrow something, you're receiving. Opposites. Antonyms.

    Google "loan antonym". Or just the opposite - Google "borrow antonym".
     
  13. AmsterdamAssassin
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    AmsterdamAssassin Contributing Member

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    No. The funny thing with loan as a verb is that it has been in British usage for some 800 years, but protest against its usage as exchangeable with the verb 'to lend', especially with money, is disputed. So, you lend someone money, you apply for a loan, but you do not loan him the money. And a loan can be interest-free.
     
  14. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    You can also loan and borrow things other than money.
     
  15. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    Ditto.
     
  16. Cacian
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    Thank you for this.
    In other words
    I can't say:
    He loaned him the money.
    but
    he lent him money.
    I must find out about the origin of LOAN.
    I thought it was originally to do with banks.
     
  17. ChickenFreak
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    All you have to do is type

    loan etymology

    into Google.
     
  18. AmsterdamAssassin
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    It also depends on how you want to use the sentence. 'Proper' usage would be 'I lent him the money', but if you want to use the phrase in dialogue, you're pretty much free of any grammar rule, as 'improper' usage would characterize your character. You can even characterize two characters, by having them discuss whether it's 'to lend' or 'to loan'.

    - I loaned him the money.
    - Lent.
    - What?
    - You lent him the money.
    - Why you have to do that, man?
    - It's just--
    - No, man. You always correct me on my grammar. Gets tiresome, you know.
    - Fine, fine. I won't do that anymore. If you want to sound like an uneducated goof, that's your prerogative.
    - There you go again, using them ten dollar words.

    And so on.
     
  19. Cacian
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    hey Amsterdam this is a great little dialoque you created there.
    I see exactly how one can get muddled up between the two.
    I did look the origin and it apparently comes from the verb lend.
     
  20. Prophetsnake
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    You mean English usage. Britons were Celts and the word they use now ( the Welsh, which would have been pretty close to the way the Brythonic) is benthyg. we use iasacht
    The Angles would have brought some germanic word resembling loan which is the origin of the word. A quick search reveals it was leihen or something simialrt, which is obviously must also the origin of the word lein.
     
  21. AmsterdamAssassin
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    AmsterdamAssassin Contributing Member

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    Another funny thing: in Dutch, the word for 'to lend' is lenen. However, there is no 'borrow'. So, to borrow or to lend or to loan is all 'lenen'. You have to know the context to understand which is which.
    Can I borrow your pencil - Kan ik je potlood lenen?
    I lent him my pencil - I leende hem mijn potlood.
    Did you apply for a loan - Heb je een lening aangevraagd?
    Lend a hand - Hulp verlenen
     
  22. AmsterdamAssassin
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    I meant, in 'British English' as opposed to 'American English', but you're right. In England, the verb 'to loan' has been used for the past 800 years. What the verb would be in Welsh or Cornish or Scottish or Irish, I don't know. That's all Gaelic to me... ;)
     
  23. Prophetsnake
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    Same auf Deutsch as far as i know ( I speak german, but I try not to take a major interest in it, since it inevitably leads to conversation with them, and who the hell wants to do that if they can avoid it?)
    They have a good few verbs like this though I'll be damned if I can think of one off the top of my head.
     
  24. Prophetsnake
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    Well, that's kind of the point, the English are Germans and they brought it with them, so it goes back a few millenia, more than likely. the English language is not much older than 800 years old, so no english word can be much older than that! Before that they were more or less the same words,but the were Angle-ish words.
    Actually, the oldest "English" dialect spoken nowadays is spoken in the Freisen islands. which is pretty close to where the Angles came from originally. That dialect is closest to the English spoken by, say, Chaucer.
     
  25. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    in american english, 'loan' is both a verb and a noun... as a verb, it is synonymous with 'lend'...

    thus it is perfectly grammatical to say 'he loaned him the money' or 'he lent him the money'...

    here's an excellent, very detailed rundown of the two: http://www.dailywritingtips.com/loan-lend-loaned-lent/
     

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