1. TyperShark
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    TyperShark New Member

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    To kill a mockingbird

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by TyperShark, Jan 26, 2010.

    For those whom it may concern,

    I am writing a novel (rather, majorly editing) that parallels the symbolism of the mockingbird in To Kill a Mockingbird. I have read it, but several years ago - most likely going to read it again just as a refresher - and have done all the research on the various symbolisms in the book. But I was wondering, as novelists, writers, publishers, and fellow readers who have read this book and either loved it or hated it, what do you think about To Kill a Mockingbird and what type of lessons can you apply to tragic situations in your life. I'd like to hear it all so please don't be shy!
     
  2. InkDream
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    InkDream Senior Member

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    I loved that book. I've been meaning to reread it, it''s collecting dust on my bookshelf right this minute. Where I'm from you're expected to love it because there's this crazy, awesome gift shop downtown called Boo Radley's (all the cool kids go there). The guy that owns it just bought a cafe a few doors down and named it Atticus Coffee. I was amused, at least.
     
  3. Evil Flamingo
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    Evil Flamingo Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ink dream: that's awesome!

    As for the original question, I absolutely loved it, when I read it four years ago. My opinions may have changed in that time though, so I'll have to read it again. But the immaculately written court scene will remain one of my most remembered scenes and close to my heart forever though.
     
  4. Unit7
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    Unit7 Contributing Member Contributor

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    When I first read it for class I didn't pay much attention to it. In fact I don't think I ever finished it. When I had to retake that class(grammar if you want to know) I reread it and fell in love with the book. I just loved the ending when we learn the true nature of Boo Radley. How everything you learned about him and his family were untrue. The whole court thing sorta unnerved me. It was clear that the man was innocent and yet he had no chance of ever being proven innocent.

    But my favorite part has to be when Scout steps into Boo's shoes and she sees everything from that angle. It was the first time the idea of stepping into someones shoes really made sense to me. I thought I understood it, but for whatever reason it became so much more clear.

    I don't think I ever understood most of the symbolism. When it comes to symbolism its a either hit or miss for me. I either get it or I don't. Sometimes I can take something and make it more symbolic then it ever was meant to be.
     
  5. Darkom
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    Darkom Member

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    My absolute favorite part about this book is how the author wrote using the words of Scout's present self looking back on her childhood, though maintained her childhood views throughout. She really made it feel like it was a child telling a story, rather than an adult telling a story about a child. Especially the scene outside the jail when she runs in front of the Cunningham mob (read it about six months ago, so it's still fresh).

    Indeed, the symbolism was good, though subtle. The actual mockingbird bit only came up a few times, but it was one of the strongest messages in the story (along with racial issues). "Don't hurt something that hasn't done anything wrong." It applied first to Jem shooting a mockingbird (a proverb-lesson from Atticus), but was eventually used on Boo. Good stuff.

    I liked the beginning, how she gives us a summary of the ending without it really registering until you finish then go back and reread it, it reminded me of Romeo and Juliet. Though I was not a fan of the ending, where Scout recalls all the events of the book up to that point with a more mature view, using metaphors and imagery. It just seemed a bit cheesy, though there was nothing specifically wrong with it, per se.
     
  6. Writt
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    Writt Member

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    Loved this book, and so glad that I didn't have to read it during my early schooling years so I could fully appreciate it. I thought she did a fantastic job of showing us the story through a child's perspective and the innocence that goes along with that. How racism isn't natural, but something that is bred through society.
     
  7. SilverWolf0101
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    SilverWolf0101 Active Member

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    Agreed, although, if I reread it again, I'll be going on my sixth round(Yeah I know a bit of overkill). The symbolism in the book is quite catchin though, and no matter how many times you read it, you can't help but be caught up in it like you were the first time you did.
     
  8. RedRaven
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    RedRaven Active Member

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    I'm trying not to read to many comments since I'm at the moment reading it for the very first time. :)
    But I will be back once I have finished it.
     
  9. RedRaven
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    RedRaven Active Member

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    I read it now and I had said I would be back to comment on it and answer the questions you posed before.

    It's a controversial theme, even nowadays in this so-called equal society most countries flourish under (George Orwell's Animal Farm always comes to mind in times like this All are equal, but some are more equal than others)

    This novel made me realise that what you don't see, doesn't mean it isn't there and that what you are afraid of, mostly is nothing to be scared off in the first place.
    That in life, when you add a little patience and grace to it, you can get farther ahead, or at least be smarter about what you venture into.
    How even one small girl can change a mob's mentality from killing to feeling ashamed and that when you step up for someone, without the intent of causing more pain and terror, you can change someone's ways, albeit it temporarily.

    More will come to me, but I just finished it and I am truly amazed about what the novel stands for. This kind of writing doesn't pop up very often.
     

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