Tags:
  1. scribbledhopes
    Offline

    scribbledhopes Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    1

    To taste the soup?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by scribbledhopes, May 4, 2008.

    Just curious,

    Do you test your writting on volunteers to see if you have good flow? Or do you keep it to yourself until all the buttons are shined and ready to
    be presented.

    Shy of them telling you what you want to hear,

    What would be the pro's and con's of both be?
     
  2. Smithy
    Offline

    Smithy Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    0
    This might sound strange, but I would say never show it to someone who thinks that they know how to write, show it instead to someone who just likes to read books. The aspiring reader will tell you how THEY would write your story, the reader will comment on the story as is.
     
  3. Banzai
    Offline

    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    Messages:
    12,871
    Likes Received:
    150
    Location:
    Reading, UK
    I generally don't show my work until it's finished. And even then, only to a few people- I have a small circle of those whose opinions I trust.

    In my mind, the problem with showing people something before it's finished means that their comments on it might dishearten you with the whole thing. I think its more important to get it right to your eyes, then any criticisms will be on the finished thing, rather than something which would have been resolved later on.
     
  4. SeaBreeze
    Offline

    SeaBreeze Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,195
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    At the bar
    I've shown stuff I have written to my friend and she has shown it to her brother. He said it was good, but he wanted to see more inner diologue, I guess the Characters thoughts or take on the situation I had put them in. So I considered it great feedback because otherwise, I probably wouldn't of done anything.
     
  5. Gloom Kitty
    Offline

    Gloom Kitty Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,769
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    in a little cage in the bowls of Cephalid
    I don't show my work to many people unless i feel that I'm happy with it myself or I'm desperete for help
     
  6. nacreous
    Offline

    nacreous New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    0
    I frequently read a passage from my recent work to the kids I work with, just to test it out. I am never really offended by the comments of children. honest, tactful feedback can happen in the strangest times and places. In once sat on south street in downtown philly for a few hours, asking passers-by to read over a recently finished short story. Boy was that helpful!
    good luck
     
  7. Gone Wishing
    Offline

    Gone Wishing Contributing Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    1,045
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Australia
    I think that it's largely dependent on what you would like to achieve.

    Friends and family are great - as a general rule - for being supportive, and giving positive feedback. Sometimes you might need that, but the danger being that the truth is often given a nice, shiny polish.

    If you want/need technical and structural advice, other writers and/or editors (such as you are likely find here) are the way to go.

    The advice you're given may vary wildly, the trick is to figure out what works best for you. Sometimes you need to hear things that don't sit well, but if you are truly seeking to improve your craft, you need to look beyond what might come off as harsh criticism and try to view your work objectively. Easier said than done a lot of the time.

    Testing the waters on potential readers can also be invaluable, as they can tell you what is working and what isn't. Sometimes it's (pleasantly) surprising to discover the different things that speak the loudest to different people.

    Of course, the most important thing with any advice, I feel, is to take it with a little grain of salt (except for things like grammar and spelling). Opinions are very subjective - and your own is the most important. :)
     
  8. scribbledhopes
    Offline

    scribbledhopes Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thankyou for your opinions

    I have shown my work to close friends and family, but worried if it wasn't a smart thing to do. Mostly to my target audience, children betweeen Six and fourteen, because of the books very unique nature I wanted to make sure it would hold intrest, which it did and I was very happy with the feedback. Helping as a writter finally dredging up the courage to attempt the dream and create the novel to unfurl my wings a bit.

    Oddly, some of the fluffy sentimental parts that I was thinking of snipping in the draft later I have found, to be thier favorite parts and made the charicter and chapter for them and made them care more for thier hero.

    So in a possitive way I have learnt.

    But some little voice said in the back of my mind told me to be careful and this may not be how a seasoned writer does it. Then again, I am not a seasoned writter so maybe this is my seasoning. Odd thought.

    I feel better, thanks.
     
  9. MumblingSage
    Offline

    MumblingSage Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    My heart in on the shores of Gitchee-Gume, my body
    When I have work I'm proud of, I show it to editors :D. Before then, I show it to people I know will help me improve--but I only show completed short stories or full chapters, not works-in-progress or snippits.

    If you're lucky enough to have a family that can help you, show it to them. But see if strangers agree with their opinions--sometimes family tries to spare your feelings. On the flip side, my dad once overcorrected my writing--pointing out things he thought were wrong grammatically but acutally weren't :D. Sometimes it's a toss-up.
     

Share This Page