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  1. GuardianWynn
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    GuardianWynn Contributing Member Contributor

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    Torn on an angle

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by GuardianWynn, Aug 27, 2015.

    Okay. So I have a short story idea in mind. Now the basic concept is a woman steals ID for well she is quirky lol. The idea is that someone tracked her down due to this quirk and is asking for help.

    Now the idea is this happened over time. Like years. His ID was stolen, kind of, and more or less he didn't care he looked into it because he was curious. He found out that the person involved is a seriously awesome person. So at the time he just left it alone. Sort of a "Well if have of this is right. I am glad nothing else happened." Hence the story being him in need of some bad ass help.

    Yet the approach. Was thinking of an prologue like opening of when they met, then a time skip to the real story.

    OR

    Just opening on her being crazy and stealing an ID. Then the phone call coming asking for help comes square out of no where but the context of you just seeing her steal and ID card gives it context as he points out that is how he tracked her.
     
  2. Lea`Brooks
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    Lea`Brooks Contributing Member Contributor

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    You should never put important story information in the prologue, I read once, because if someone doesn't read it, they'll be lost.

    I'd go the second route--start right from her stealing an id. The phone call can be explained and context can be given, so don't worry about it seeming weird.

    If you decide later you really want that prologue, add it. But don't change the beginning of the story. The prologue should not replace the first chapter. If I read your book but not the prologue, I shouldn't feel that I missed something important to the story by not reading that prologue.

    Make sense?
     
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  3. GuardianWynn
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    GuardianWynn Contributing Member Contributor

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    I suppose on reflection I might have phrased the question poorly.

    Because it is a short story. So it isn't really a prologue I think or I wouldn't call it one. The question more is it better to open on this scene then flash into the future where the story happens. Or just open on the story and reference the never seen flashback?

    Seems awkward to open, then flash forward five years. Which is why I said like a prologue yet at the same time it has the neat feature of no longer needed context in the future scene. As you would have saw them react, instead of being told briefly that they reacted with each other.

    Is that better wording?

    Thanks again. :)
     
  4. Lea`Brooks
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    Lea`Brooks Contributing Member Contributor

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    If it's a short story, I'd open with the second option. It's a waste of time almost to show how they met when it can easily be summarized in a sentence or paragraph later in the story.
     
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  5. GuardianWynn
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    GuardianWynn Contributing Member Contributor

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    Thanks.

    How have you been? On a side note.

    I hope well. :D
     

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