1. Mercurial
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    Mercurial Contributing Member Contributor

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    University

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Mercurial, Jan 19, 2009.

    Please dont eat me if this isn't in the right location! :p I deliberated between a few boards, but none seemed quite right for my question, so I figured that I couldnt go wrong with the Lounge, right?

    I'm nervous about asking this, because it's probably only going to benefit me, but I figured you guys would be knowledgeable in this area, and it really is an important question to me.

    I'm going to unversity in a year and a half --destination: east coast, but not necessarily Ivy (although not ruled out). I want to work in the world of publishing as a book editor and perhaps one day a publisher, so I assume a degree in English would be a good idea. Do any of you have any ideas what I should minor (or just double major) in? I was thinking business, but I'd really prefer not to have anything to do with business unless it would make a significant difference. Perhaps communications?
    How specific do you think I should be? General English, Creative Writing, Rhetorics, Linguistics? -- General Business, Marketing, etc.

    I ask you this because I'd like to go to a school with a strong program in both areas of interest for me; it's instrumental in my decision (which really should be made in the next few months, so that I can tour campuses this summer).

    Post scriptum: I hope this isnt considered 'homework help;' according to CreativeMind's post in the Feedback forum, that is prohibited.
     
  2. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    I think taking some business courses would be helpful, but don't necessarily need to be your focus depending on what area of publishing you want to work in. I don't know about American programs, but there are some that focus on publishing that you can take, even ones that only last a few months.
     
  3. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    Merc,

    If I was returning to college with the specific goal of building a career in the "publishing" industry, I would have a dual major...English and Marketing. English for obvious reasons. Marketing because the traditional publishing companies are currently struggling with the direction of the industry. The internet, audio-books, digital books, POD and vanity press...all these publishing options are threats to traditional publishers and the old way of marketing books. Survivors in the current competition for a limited resource...readers...survivors will come from the most innovative companies in marketing. Since survival DEPENDS on profits...the primary need of traditional publishers will be innovative marketing concepts and profitable sales programs, hence, the degree in marketing will be an important asset for an aspiring management-level employee.
     
  4. rory
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    rory Contributing Member

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    I agree with NaCl. A general English and especially Marketing.
    I've taken several Marketing type classes and business related classes and they are really interesting. Plus they involved a lot of writing and creativity, which is always nice.
    The more I learn about the 'real world' the more important I find marketing is. If you can market something successfully, I'll bet there are an number of businesses that would want to hire you from any number of industries.
    And business majors aren't so bad. I'm kind of taking one and besides the financial stuff, which is all very important I'm sure, it's pretty neat and very rewarding.
     
  5. Mercurial
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    Mercurial Contributing Member Contributor

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    Thank you so much --all of you. :)
    I'm going to start delving into the world of marketing as suggested and see which schools that I'm interested in have strong programs in both of those areas; I think that'll help a lot when it comes time to make my college decision. *fear!*

    I dont know much about marketing, having never taken a class and tuning out what has been taught to me about business. --Perhaps not a wise move, but I prefer my fictitious world as opposed to the way our world really works. :p ...But just the name sounds like it'd be a good thing to know and understand if I'm looking to go into the publishing field (or any other field, I'm thinking).

    Rory- Thanks for letting me know that it's not all finance and policies (veto!veto!). I dont know how I'd be able to stand it if it was.

    And NaCl (still love your username; clever), I really appreciate everything you've explained to me; I dont think I would have gotten this information anywhere else. I know I have plenty of time to make this decision, but I'd been thinking about double majoring anyways (I'm going to graduate high school with 12 credit hours, so I dont actually think it'd be too daunting), so that's probably the way I'll go. Thank you so much! (And also for soothing my nerves. I was worried about posting this, because I'm probably the only one who'll benefit from this thread when the Lounge is, so I'm gathering, more for group conversation and discussion. :) )

    Rei, I dont know if the USA has similar programs or not, but now I'm definitely intrigued; something with exactly the right program I'm looking for would be most helpful indeed. *vigorously begins to research*

    I really appreciate everyone's help. My school is known for its academic superiority and ability to pump out Ivy-destined students, but its not necessarily strong in its college-career-counseling department. I dont think I would have been able to get these answers that really are vital anywhere else! :)
     
  6. PrincessGarnet
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    PrincessGarnet Contributing Member

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    Why not contact some publishing companies to ask what they are looking for in graduates?
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    good advice from pg... but you don't have to call them... you can find out by just going to the major publishing houses sites and looking up employment guidelines...

    and salty's advice is always spot on!

    no need to worry, since it really means you can post anything about anything here [as long as it's 'clean' enough to meet the site rules 'n regs]...
     
  8. Mercurial
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    Mercurial Contributing Member Contributor

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    Princess --Now that you point it out, I'm wondering why I hadn't thought of that myself! Thank you for the suggestion!
    I'm going to start out with Maia's advice and research employee guidlines so I'm a bit more educated, but 'm very likely going to form some questions that I still have right now (and will most likely create by looking through the guidlines) and contact some publishing companies directly, too!

    I'm so glad I asked this question; I never would have thought of these answers. :)
     
  9. jwilder
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    It you're looking to go into the arts - in any form (theatre, music, writing, and yes, even publishing) get the business degree. There are many facets to business - it's not all about financial accounting and writing memos. I have a degree in production theatre, and a dual degree in both Marketing and Logistics. It has been great to have all three degrees because I can draw on any of them at any time to highlight a certain set of skills for a potential client. Business degrees can transfer to any career path and will give you a well-rounded, applicable skill set for any job.

    Also, look into schools that have business publishing programs. There are some US schools that have specific minor tracks tailored to the business of publishing, writing, editing, etc. Sort of an all-in-one package. I don't know about schools outside the US, although I've heard Canada has some similar programs. Good luck!
     
  10. Leaka
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    Leaka Creative Mettle

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    I had a question about University. Sorry about kinda hijacking you thread to ask my University question, but I thought why make another University thread when you have this one.
    Is it better to major in English in a college or a university?
    If you don't have or won't ever get a scholarship how expensive are universities?
    Would it be wise to go to a university just for majoring in English and Creative writing? <---would like to do both
     
  11. rory
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    rory Contributing Member

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    Leaka, not sure if it's the same where I'm from as it is for you, but as far as I'm aware the only real difference between University and College is class size. In my experience, anyway, which is limited.
    As for scholarships, they are nice, but if you can save up or work while in school, college/university is reasonably affordable, I think. It's living expenses that get ya. (Starving college kids are no joke.)
    But Scholarships and Bursaries are open to pretty much everyone. All you have to do is apply, which sometimes involve essays and what not, but we like writing, no?
    And I have no opinion for you're last question, but if it was me I'd probably just do English.

    I'm considering going back to school and taking English as well, but not for a few years. My savings have been depleted. :rolleyes:
     
  12. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    If you have a Career Center at your high school, the counselor there can answer all of your questions. I do know that colleges & universities in the U.S. are the same thing. Community colleges are different than colleges, though--usually you can only get an associate's degree (2 year degree) there. Community colleges are cheaper than colleges/universities. I'm in a running start program (early college) where the community college credits are only about $100/credit if I had to pay for it. College/university tuition varies so greatly. It's best to start researching and preparing while you're still a junior in HS.
     
  13. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    The principle difference between 4-year colleges (often called state colleges) and universities is the availability of advanced degrees. The basic 4-yr degree is the Bachelor's degree. It certifies competency at a certain academic level and is available at both types of institutions. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people "flippin burgers" who have achieved a Bachelor's degree...one that is not the working degree for their field of study.

    For example, a BA (Bachelor of Arts) degree in psychology is pretty useless. The "working" degree in clinical or industrial psychology is the PhD (called the Doctorate degree). Similarly, the working degree in social work is the MSW - Masters in Social Work. On the other hand, a Bachelor's degree in Engineering or Geology provides lots of degree-related employment. My son-in-law is a geologist with a BS (Bachelor of Science degree) and he has become a leading field geologist in hydrothermal exploration.

    So, when you consider a 4-year state college versus a university, one important consideration is whether or not you plan to continue into advanced studies. Also, some 4-yr state colleges DO offer the Masters and Doctorate degrees but their programs are rarely held in the same level of esteem as the university programs. For example, a PhD from Stanford or Harvard is perceived as much better education than a PhD from some state college.

    Finally, there are certain "bonehead" degrees that carry bad reputations. One that comes to mind is the Bachelors degree in "Communications Studies". Guess who gets this degree? Athletes! Yep, it is often a simplified degree with little comprehensive studies...it's primary value is to allow athletes an easy way to get a "C" average and remain eligible for athletics under NCAA rules.

    In my local 4-yr state college (called California State University, Sacramento), you can get a Bachelor's degree in most any field. They offer a Master's degree in a few areas and only one true PhD program of which I am aware. By the way, the State of California offers two levels of 4-yr "college"...CSU (Ca. State Universities) and the UC (University of California) system. The CSU level is geared to cheaper cost and the Bachelor Degree. The UC system costs a lot more and offers many recognized advanced degrees. Big name schools in the UC system include UCLA, UC Berkley and UC Davis (world renowned for their Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture PhD).

    Of course, there are also many "private" universities that offer both advanced degrees AND outstanding reputations...Notre Dame, MIT, Harvard, etc. Any degree from these big name private schools will "open doors" for you...especially in the snob world of New York publishers.

    One last point about universities versus 4-yr colleges...most universities engage in extensive research programs that offer both cutting edge studies as well as employment opportunities to help students with the higher costs. I helped pay for my education by working as a research assistant in a psycho-physics experiment involving musical acoustic auditory perception.
     
  14. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    The American system is somewhat different than in Canadian. Class size is definitely not what makes them different, too. There are some university classes that have less than twenty students in them. The difference is more about methods, at least in Ontario, and more college programs have a specific career direction than university programs because its more practical. I learned how to do a counselling session in my second semester, whereas a psychology student in university probably would not. The level of qualifications are different, too. I studied education, but I can't be a teacher. The social work students from college also can't get the same jobs as someone with a degree in social work.
     
  15. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    the difference is not class size, but the fact that a university has several 4-year colleges to choose from... and it offers advanced degrees [master's/phd], while a college does not... universities also often have research branches, which you wouldn't find in a college...

    unfortunately, some places/people misuse the term 'university' in a silly attempt to impress folks who don't know any better...
     
  16. rory
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    rory Contributing Member

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    :redface:


    My bad. Just disregard my post.
     
  17. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i didn't mean you!

    hugs, m
     
  18. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    Some colleges do have master's degree programs, but maybe it's rare?
     
  19. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    In that case, it may be that they are partnered with universities. *shrugs* In Ontario, you can't get a degree from a college alone, but a bunch of college programs are partnered with a nearby university so that people can get a degree that way if they don't have the high school credits to go directly to university.
     

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