1. spivaklang
    Offline

    spivaklang New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Use of Passive Voice

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by spivaklang, Oct 22, 2006.

    In a essay (i.e critical essay about a piece of literature) is it bad to use the passive voice? When do writers use passive voice? It seems that writers are restricted if they cannot use passive voice.
     
  2. IndianaJoan
    Offline

    IndianaJoan Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Washington State
    Well..I am not certain about essays. I tend to shy away from passive voice in anything i do..but i write fiction..so bleh..im not a lot of help with that..

    I will however do some research on that for you :)
     
  3. Hellbent
    Offline

    Hellbent Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Wasilla, Alaska
    What's passive voice again?
     
  4. IndianaJoan
    Offline

    IndianaJoan Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Washington State
    Ok heres a bit I found on passive voice..

    As I thought, you really want to avoid using passive voice in writing. It tends to make the reader lose interest quickly..but heres a brief explanation to clarify it.

    "passive voice produces a sentence in which the subject "receives" an action. Active voice produces a sentence in which the subject "performs" an action. Passive voice often produces wordy, unclear sentences, whereas active voice produces clearer more concise sentences.

    To change a sentence from passive to active voice, determine who or what performs that action and use that person or thing as the "subject" of the sentence.

    Passive voice occurs when you make the object of an action into the subject of a sentence. Passive sentence are fairly easy to spot. Look for forms of "to be" such as is, am are, was, were, has, have been followed by a past participle ( a form of a verb ending in -ed , though there are exception to this rule such as "paid" and "driven". "

    Ok well theres some stuff that I found on passive voice. From everything I read passive voice is to be avoided EVEN in essays.

    I will try to post some more on this subject later. This is actually a problem for me in my writing, so I am learning as I google. Hope this helps some of you as well.
     
  5. Hellbent
    Offline

    Hellbent Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Wasilla, Alaska
    So then passive voice is forming a sentence where the object appears to be the subject rather than the actual subject?
     
  6. Spherical Time
    Offline

    Spherical Time Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Everywhere, Always
    Yeah, like "was driven." That's bad.

    Of course, I'm a horrible offender.

    ETA: Ooops . . . . a triple post. Stupid internet connection. Sorry. A mod can delete the next two, if they want.
     
  7. Veronica0406
    Offline

    Veronica0406 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Boise, Idaho
  8. Master Attano
    Offline

    Master Attano Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Aotearoa, Land of the Long White Cloud.
    By Passive do you mean neutral? If so writers use it so that their work isn't influenced overly by their opinion. This is good for works such as historical essays.
     

Share This Page