1. astrostu
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    astrostu Member

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    Using "-like" When Two Words Precede?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by astrostu, Apr 29, 2011.

    Question when using "-like" when the thing you are describing is two words. For example, one would say, "The light was so bright it was sun-like." But what about, "I'm arranging an interface that's video game-like."

    If I were writing it as an equation, the -like refers to both "video" and "game" so it would be "(video game)-like" but obviously that doesn't make for good grammar. Is it just as I wrote it above, or does one put a space so it's "video game -like" to indicate it doesn't just apply to "game," or is there something else?
     
  2. popsicledeath
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    popsicledeath Banned

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    Good question. I don't know the official, true answer, but hope somebody does. My guess would be video-game-like... err which still looks bad, but expresses the proper grammar, I believe.

    Probably a situation where I'd just reorder: like a video game or as in a video game or akin to a video game.

    Come to think of it, I don't even like the single word constructions like this. To me, they're annoying-like.
     
  3. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    that's the only 'correct' way to do it, imo... same goes for '-wise'...
     
  4. lostinwebspace
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    lostinwebspace Active Member

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    I think you'd use an en dash instead of a hyphen there, but, yeah... what mammamaia said. If you're worried, rephrase it.
     

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