1. KelKutThroat
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    KelKutThroat Member

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    Vital or useless?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by KelKutThroat, Dec 3, 2009.

    Okay so I'm currently mid-way through my book and like most authors do, I tend to change my book around a lot.
    The thing about me is (this is a very stupid contrast that I've made up) my writing is like a sandwich, I can place the bread down and butter it (start and finish) but the filling in the middle is too rushed— instead of going the full set of lettuce, tomatoes and sandwich dressing I just slap the ham on and I'm finished. I like to detail things but explaining something bores me sometimes, I just want to stick my teeth into the action and gore and remove every other bit, problem is I've read some books like this and I notice that it can get uninteresting and repetitive.

    What I'm asking is, do you think it's vital to have full explanations throughout your book, like a few pages on a normal day at school, or having a useless conversation with another character. Or— is staying on the constant story line a better way to approach it?

    Much appreciated to see your views.
    Kelsey :)
     
  2. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    I prefer adding things which are essential to the story or improve characterization. Anything extra just seems like fluff.

    It seems like you are focusing more on action than anything else. Take the time to work on characterization. A conversation with another character is not really useless since it can provide a lot of insight into how characters think and/or why they act the way they do. If you truly feel that it's useless, then try including a conversation having to do with something related to the main conflict or something important going on in the book.
     
  3. KelKutThroat
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    KelKutThroat Member

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    I agree, I just find that some useless extracts from previous books I've read have just wasted time— for example Meyer with the Twilight Saga there were so many parts in her books that seemed way too much, and very tiresome.

    I'll have to focus more with the around story, I'm always a get-straight-into-it writer but I find some parts really rushed, I'll have to re-look over everything and add extra bits just to make sure that whoever reads it in the future can comprehend the story to its full potential.


    Thanks, K :)
     
  4. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    KelKutThroat,

    No. It is not vital to have full explanations througout the novel. Let the character use their imagination and fill in some of the blanks. Don't lead the reader around by the nose and attempt to be over-controlling as an author.

    And unless the few normal days at school serve a purpose in the plot or character development, they don't belong there either. Maybe there would be an arguement for pacing and having some highs and lows in action, but in my opinion, those should be combined with information/action/content relevant to advancing the story--not filler.

    I know it's kind of a general answer, and may not exactly fit the situatuion, but from what was presented, I think I'm on target (as I see things).

    Good luck.

    Terry
     
  5. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    There is another thread similar to this that I brought up what Cogito once said on yet another thread which was to avoid the mundane. I have an example which I wrote today. Someone was giving mail to be sent, but I did not exactly write everything he and the mail man said to each other.
     
  6. HorusEye
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    HorusEye Contributing Member Contributor

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    Character and atmosphere is your sandwich filling. Don't add random stuff just to make your sandwich thicker, rather add in those lovely things that make it taste better and with which it can't do without. Get under the skin of your characters and let them live, but let them live through the storyline, not everyday randomness. Make the world around them come alive by diving into it yourself and tell us what it's like from an inside perspective. Before you know it, your sandwich's gonna be both much thicker and much tastier.
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    if you'd been doing enough reading of good writing, i doubt you'd have had to ask these questions... constant reading of the best writing gives one a solid grounding in what it looks, reads, and feels like... it results in the mind 'absorbing' what makes up the kind of writing that 'works' for the reader... then, when one starts to write, it comes more or less 'naturally'...

    so, do more reading of the best stuff and you'll have the answers to your questions...
     

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