1. yokone
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    yokone Member

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    Welded Aluminum specimens or welded aluminums specimens

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by yokone, Dec 30, 2010.

    Yes, again me...

    I m sorry but I always get problems with English writing. And here my new question.

    I was writing a paper and I wanted to write a sentence like;

    Welded aluminums specimens. BUT it sounds alittle weird to me.

    However there are three kind of aluminums with different names, so I think it is not grammatically correct to write "welded aluminum specimens".

    So, which one is grammatically correct?
    Also, could I use construction for these specimens. Or Can we use it for just the buildings?

    Ex:
    Welded aluminums construction...

    Thank you
     
  2. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    You would say welded aluminium specimens
    or perhaps, specimens of welded aluminium.

    Note that the s falls on specimen and not aluminium.

    It is not incorrect to say welded aluminium constructions - where constructions is used instead of specimens or pieces - but it is unusual.

    More normally, we might, for example, say: pieces of welded aluminium are much used throughout the construction (here, construction means building as you have understood it)
     
  3. ChickenFreak
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    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    "Welded aluminum specimens" would be correct, even though there are three kinds of aluminum. If you had walkways made of shale, slate, and sandstone, it would still be correct to refer to "stone walkways" rather than "stones walkways". They are all stone, just as your specimens are all aluminum, even if it is possible to create subsets within that description.

    If you want to make it clear that there are different materials, you could say, "welded specimens made of various types of aluminum", or something of the sort.

    And "welded aluminum construction" is correct or, again, you could expand it, as in, "welded construction composed of various types of aluminum."

    (I should note that I'm using the American spelling, "aluminum" rather than the British spelling, "aluminium." I don't know which is correct for your writing.)

    ChickenFreak
     
  4. yokone
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    yokone Member

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    Thank you guys! I got it.
    In this study I had another problem with the usage of "the".
    I prefered to use "the" before the aluminum types whenever I wrote them after I described them for the first time.
    All types of the material have a proper name.
    For example there is a special type of aluminum with the name of AXXX, and the other one has another name like AYYY. I used "the" whenever I wrote them after the first time.

    Like:
    AXXX is a good material to decrease the weight of the construction.
    And in another pragraph, I wrote that
    The AXXX has high strength.

    I used it for all types of the material in my study, so it looks the study plunged in a "the" sea.

    But I have to use "the", don't I? So Was I mistaken or not?
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    'the' is ok as you used it... but it's not really necessary, as the sentence works without it... however, if you're pointing out the difference with that kind, over other kinds, then 'the' in front makes good sense...
     
  6. yokone
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    yokone Member

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    Thank you so much
     

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