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What Is Plot Creation and Development?

Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Cogito, May 23, 2008.

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  1. Ankoku Teion

    Ankoku Teion Active Member

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    funny, that's my exact reaction whenever i see a thread that starts by complaining about people who ask for help or input.

    have you considered that these people might be seeking some support because they lack confidence in their own abilities,

    or perhaps they are aware of their own weaknesses and want some input to improve that area, i myself know that im terrible at comming up with names, especially names for countries. i also struggle to populate my story line with enough events to stretch out the story long enough.
     
  2. domenic.p

    domenic.p Banned

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    Ditto,
    Your comment is spot on.

    The want of something:
    A seasoned writer may deviate from the norm, but will never deviate from the desire of both protagonist, and antagonist. Many new writers think this conflict is between the good guy, and the bad guy. It could be between a law, and a person who feels the law is wrong, or as I did in Naked in West Upton, between a town, and land developers. There could be sub plots along the way. Just be sure to have all the sub plots closed before ending the story.

    There are three keys to the plot: The want, opposition to the want, and a conflict that interest the reader.


    A well written plot need not take the writer more than 4-5 sentences. To have a good story a writer must have a plot (subject) readers have an interest in. It is the characters who act out the plot. If the subject of the plot is one that interest the reader(s), they will be rooting for the main character(s). If a writer stays with the three basic keys to a plot, they will have a story that will sell.
     
  3. EricaJRothwell

    EricaJRothwell Active Member

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    Reading this thread has helped me! Especially the actor, goal, motivaton, opposition bit, Thank you, Cogito!
     
  4. Louis D. Thorpe

    Louis D. Thorpe Member

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    What is the storyline in the Catcher in the Rye?
     
  5. fivetoesten

    fivetoesten Member

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    Sparknotes
    Cliffnotes
     
  6. Rick n Morty

    Rick n Morty Active Member

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    So, I have a story that I plan on posting on this site in Wikipedia synopsis form. (You know, like a basic description of the plot/storyline.) That way I can get critique on what to improve about the story and characterization. (The actual way it's written isn't a big deal to me, since I picture it as a movie more than as a book. Plus, the story and characters are the most important part of any work of fiction.)

    Here's a plot/storyline description of The Secret of NIMH that should give you an idea of what I want to post here.
    http://www.cataroo.com/DBnimh.html

    Am I allowed to post it on this subforum? I asked it in the support and feedback section, but I didn't get all the answers I wanted.
     
  7. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    If you post a basic description in a similar format to The Secret of NIMH, I suspect you'll get even less help than you've had so far.

    I clicked on the link, took a quick look at that wall of text, and how much detail (As she scurries home with the medicine from Mr. Ages, Brisby runs headlong into clumsy Jeremy the crow, who's allergic to cats. When she meets him, he is tangled up in a number of brightly colored strings. His loud proclamations that he is searching for Miss Right brings [incidentally, proclamations is plural, so it should be the singular bring] on Dragon, the farmer's monstrous cat who savagely lunges at both of them.) it goes into, and clicked back off it. This reads like a whole story being told (1648 words - I'd think twice whether I wanted to read and critique a short story of that length) and not being shown. i.e., it's a story that doesn't engage me, the reader, at all.

    Is the paragraph I quoted ESSENTIAL to the plot? I suspect not, it's merely another twist. But it's written as if it's the story, including descriptive words (scurries, headlong, clumsy, proclamations, monstrous, savagely, lunges) that could have been simplified if it's a synopsis.
     
  8. Rosacrvx

    Rosacrvx Active Member

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    Thank you for the original post.
    I wasn't taught Literature like you English speakers have, but I find all these concepts very clarifying.
     
  9. MrIntensity

    MrIntensity Member

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    I literally did just that, then I read this and thought "i'm making an arse of myself." and changed it. Never mind your post has definitely given me a piece of mind when constructing a plot or story, especially since I'm trying to break away from the standard themes and plot structures.
     
  10. PhantomThief

    PhantomThief New Member

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    Thanks for clearing up the difference between plot and storyline. Quick question, do you believe it is a good method to outline the storyline by each chapter? I've often done that but sometimes felt that it takes the surprise out of writing, and other writers will say the exact same thing.
     
  11. Simpson17866

    Simpson17866 Contributing Member Contributor

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    That's not a quick question ;) Rivers of blood have been shed in the arguments between "Outlining works for me, therefore everybody should!" versus "Outlining doesn't work for me, therefore nobody should!" versus "Outlining ['does' or 'doesn't'] work for me, but isn't that just a personal preference and not an actual rule?"

    50% of the time, trying both and seeing which works better will – axiomatically – work better than just picking one and hoping it works better than the other.

    Personally, I need a chapter-by-chapter outline unless the story is ridiculously short, but I've still tried writing without one (again, tends to work better for something extremely short than for some part of something longer).
     

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