1. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    What to call this sensation?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Wreybies, Jul 23, 2013.

    Or how to refer to it. (noun, verb, etc.)

    You've just bitten into an unripe fruit. The acidic, green nature of the fruit has the effect of somehow changing your saliva, cutting its slippery quality (I assume by breaking the long protein chains). Suddenly the inside of your mouth doesn't work as it should. You can't get the bit you've chewed back to swallow it. The backs of your teeth feel like they've been cleaned with acid and the frictional power of your tongue is enough to make it catch and stutter like rubber over a smooth surface.

    In Spanish we have a word for this, amarrar, which means to tie, but that doesn't work because tied in relationship to the mouth has a known and very different meaning in English. Or... is that perhaps the right word and I've just never heard it used that way?

    Anyone?
     
  2. erebh
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    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Are you looking for one word to describe biting full force into a peeled lemon, face scrunched like a crumpled apple, head vibrating seeing water through slits for eyes.

    Show us the context with the blank and maybe...
     
  3. Garball
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    Garball Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand. Supporter Contributor

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    Astringency?
     
  4. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    No context. :redface: It just happened to me in real life with a carambola I picked from the tree down at the end of the woods on the property. It was to be part of my breakfast. When it happened, I thought, ugh, not again, and realized I don't know a word or term for this phenomenon in English, but I do in Spanish. Certain hard salami will do this same thing to your palate and when you buy them here in the store, the ones that won't have a little sticker that says no amarra, or won't tie [your palate]. Is that perhaps the way to say say it? The fruit wasn't ripe and it tied my palate.
     
  5. Pheonix
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    Pheonix A Singer of Space Operas and The Fourth Mod of RP Staff Contributor

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    I know exactly what you're talking about...

    It's like your mouth is suddenly puffy inside and full of fur. I can't think of how to explain it any better though... :(

    Interesting that there is a phrase for it in spanish, but not english... Language is a strange thing.
     
  6. hibiscus
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    hibiscus Member

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    in translation's business (although your case would be the opposite), in this situation to translate from foreign language which have no correct or close enough word to describe, there are 2 choices:

    -explain in a few words
    -create a new word (could be confusing to reader and have to be explained at bottom of page)

    just my 2 cents
     
  7. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Garball beat me to it: astringency. Or perhaps acerbity or stypticity.
     
  8. erebh
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    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

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    If it's a phrase you're looking for, in Ireland we'd say 'spitting feathers'.
     
  9. Garball
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    Garball Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand. Supporter Contributor

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    Is that like cotton mouth from a hangover?
     
  10. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Even Russian has a phrase to describe this unique phenomenon, Набить oскомину, but I still struggle to find one for English....
     
  11. mrieder79
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    mrieder79 Not a ground squirrel

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    Cotton mouth seems to be the closest approximation that I can think of in terms of a common colloquialism. Generally the phrase is associated with parching, but it is akin to what you have described.
     
  12. erebh
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    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Yeah, you know when you've a mouth like Ghandi's flip-flop?
     
  13. Garball
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    Garball Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand. Supporter Contributor

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    Like a cat took a shit in your mouth
     
  14. Volcre
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    Volcre Member

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    I don't think we have a word that directly describes it. But would you say it makes your mouth clammy? Or your throat/saliva thick?
     

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