1. RLJ
    Offline

    RLJ Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Miami, Florida

    What's happened to my drive?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by RLJ, Aug 4, 2014.

    I struggled for almost two years to get out a suitable plot that I felt comfortable with pursuing. Over the course of the time that I was trying to work out the kinks in my plot, I started a variety of drafts--where I could write page-upon-page of detail and action effortlessly. The writing, of course, didn't go anywhere but it as easy.

    Now that I've started trying to write under a plot where I have some direction. It seems I can't go anywhere with my writing. It's as if I can't propel my story forward. I have this solid plot with an ending, however vague, i mind but I can't move my ideas along as I used to. It's rather vexing because it's not like I'm lacking in skill. I could do it before!

    Any advice?
     
  2. Link the Writer
    Offline

    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    11,223
    Likes Received:
    4,228
    Location:
    Alabama, USA
    Well, did you spend too much time on the detail and not on the story itself? That could do it sometimes.
     
  3. Ulramar
    Offline

    Ulramar Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    My own fantasy world, living the good life
    Is your story just not possible? I've found that I had something that was AMAZING but it just wasn't possible, and I couldn't move it anywhere. Or, as Link the Writer suggested, you may have just focused too much time on the detail. If you fantasized about the plot too much you could have lost interest.
     
  4. RLJ
    Offline

    RLJ Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Miami, Florida
    That could definitely be one of the problems. It's set in the 1870s, so there was a lot of research to be done. I spent lots of time fleshing out details of the story and I may have neglected the story itself. I'm wondering how I move on from having made such a mistake and getting back to basics of the writing so I can at least get through my first draft.
     
  5. RLJ
    Offline

    RLJ Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Miami, Florida
    That's what I'm scared of. I may have to scrap it and start fresh. I have many other ideas for a possible--hopefully one day--novel. So I may have to just go in a different direction. Have you any suggestions for what I might do differently? I would hate to lost out on TWO good ideas.
     
  6. Ulramar
    Offline

    Ulramar Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    My own fantasy world, living the good life
    I had been procrastinating on writing a specific story (second one in my series of seven that I hope to write) and fantacizing about it as often as possible, trying to make it as perfect as possible. I had a fairly perfect idea, and I couldn't write it when I sat down and tried.

    Say you're writing ABCD. Well you spent too much time thinking about it, imagining every scene and every feeling involved. Now you can't write it.
    So write ACBD. Or BCAD. Take your original plot, the skeleton, the bare bones, and strip everything else off. Then start rebuilding. But instead of staring out through a window imagining it, imagine it with your fingers on a keyboard. Type it out instead of dreaming about it.
     
  7. Charisma
    Offline

    Charisma Transposon Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    2,704
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Lahore, Pakistan
    Perhaps take a break from the project for some time. Your mind might just be saturated to the point the plot seems mundane, so give yourself some time away so that the monotony is broken and the project seems exciting again.
     
  8. aguywhotypes
    Offline

    aguywhotypes Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    77
    Location:
    Millersburg, Ohio, United States
    After reading your original post, I had to think of what Seth Godin said. Most people don't want to start anything until they have all their ducks in a row. The problem with this is that it usually takes a lifetime to do that by then it feels pointless and/or to late.

    So instead just get one duck and start.
     
  9. domenic.p
    Offline

    domenic.p Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    63
    Split you work into three parts: beginning, middle, and end. Leave the part you are in. Go to a different part, and different character. Now just write one short scene. A story is made up of scenes. They can be long, or short. Short scenes move the story along fast, long ones slower. You can move scenes around your story if doing so will help the story.
    Knowing the whole story before you start writing will prevent such blocks. Moving from section to section also helps. You can write many scenes that are not related. You can shift them around later. It's the same as doing a puzzle.

    Many writers try to write a story from the first word to the last. This a a very slow way to write a story. If you just start writing scenes, things will come faster to you.

    You will get many different methods suggested , so follow what you will.
     
    Wreybies likes this.
  10. Wreybies
    Offline

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    18,915
    Likes Received:
    10,108
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    This is what works for me and is pretty much my natural way of writing anyway. I usually know at least five major points in my story. Three of them are the traditional beginning, middle and and, and other two a connecting points between the three. When I'm stuck, I go to a different portion and get a fresh perspective in my head. BTW, for what is described by @domenic.p, Scrivener is an excellent tool.
     
  11. peachalulu
    Offline

    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,829
    Likes Received:
    2,383
    Location:
    occasionally Oz , mainly Canada
    I'm having pretty much the same problem kicking off my novel projects. I don't seem to have any problem with short stories but the second I know it's going to be a novel a cold sweat starts - I kick off three pages maybe five than nothing. I have no idea how to fix it. Maybe examine how this project differs from your other successful projects.
     
  12. Charisma
    Offline

    Charisma Transposon Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    2,704
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Lahore, Pakistan
    That's one advice I come across quite often. I'm skeptical about it though, writing chronologically always seems 'safe' because I know I won't skip on the slower parts only because I've written on the fun scenes. I've never tried it, but I wonder if it would result in my said apprehension.
     

Share This Page