1. HellOnEarth
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    HellOnEarth Banned

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    When does creative writing become "important"?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by HellOnEarth, Apr 17, 2007.

    When does creative writing go from freedom of expression to "smoking gun of future killer"? There have been many cases in the post 9/11 and Columbine USA coming down on people for things they've written - fictional or not.

    Is this fair? Where is the line? Should we reign in every twisted writer because they might snap? Is this a smoking gun or do we just need to find an answer in hopes of changing a hazy future?

    Should we lynch Stephen King?
     
  2. Raven
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    Raven Banned

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    The thing with writers is this is supposed to be a free world thus giving people the option to buy the books written or not to buy them. its their choice. Humanities nature is to lynch. Sadley
     
  3. Torana
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    Torana Contributing Member Contributor

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    This is the reason why 90% of my poetry is not posted online. I have written poetry that is pretty dark and some parts of my poetry about death and murder pretty gruesome, so I have been told.
    So I just keep that kind of stuff in the draw. But as Raven has said

    .

    ~Torana
     
  4. Gannon
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    Gannon Contributing Member Contributor

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    The difference is in the name 'creative writing'; one is a limitless sphere where all worlds are possible and the writings that one shouls perhaps fear are those that are documented plans of destruction - I would hope the distinction is clear enough even to the least assiduous of investigator.

    It is no surprise that a disturbed individual has previously written disturbed prose or whatever - it acts as catharsis and could well prevent an atrocity of the like you speak - I would be more concerned if a shooter had not lain down their thoughts before such an attack.
     
  5. daisydaisy
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    daisydaisy Member

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    The thing is, writing is an expressive art. Violent people are violent by nature, whether they express what they feel through writing or not. The dangerous part is, they can influence other people to follow their lead through what they write, and therefor create something more powerful.
     
  6. Heather Louise
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    Heather Louise Contributing Member Contributor

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    yes, but does that mean that the violent person souldn't write like that, in fear of its consequences? i tihnk that you should write how you want,a bout what you want. let your imagination run wild!! lol.
    Heather
     
  7. daisydaisy
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    daisydaisy Member

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    No, not at all. We all have the right to write words to express ourselves, no matter what. And those sorts of people know how powerful their words are. What's that saying? "Words have the power to create or kill" and it's so true.
     
  8. Heather Louise
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    Heather Louise Contributing Member Contributor

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    i wish i could write that good, for people to think of me as having power. although i would use it for good only ;) lol.
    Heather
     
  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i made my own decision on this subject over a dozen years ago... after a long and enjoyable career of writing fiction that included very 'creative' violence, i took a solemn vow to never again aid or abet the use of violence for entertainment and left all my old life's work behind, when i divested myself all i owned, along with my old identity...

    some of my reasons, if you need to know them, can be found in the writings on my website... specifically in the essays:

    why your money's no good
    alms for the rich
    triage
    what am i?
     
  10. HellOnEarth
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    HellOnEarth Banned

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    "I've thought about it, of course. Certainly in this sensitized day and age, my own college writing — including a short story called ''Cain Rose Up'' and the novel RAGE — would have raised red flags, and I'm certain someone would have tabbed me as mentally ill because of them, even though I interacted in class, never took pictures of girls' legs with my cell phone (in 1970, WHAT cell phones?), and never signed my work with a ?.

    As a teacher, I had one student — I will call him George — who raised red flags galore in my own mind: stories about flaying women alive, dismemberment, and, the capper, ''getting back at THEM.'' George was very quiet, and verbally inarticulate. It was only in his written work that he spewed these relentless scenes of gore and torture. His job was in the University Bookstore, and when I inquired about him once, I was told he was a good worker, but ''quiet.'' I thought, ''Whoa, if some kid is ever gonna blow, it'll be this one.'' He never did. But that was in the days before a gun-totin' serial killer could get top billing on the Nightly News and possibly the covers of national magazines.

    For most creative people, the imagination serves as an excretory channel for violence: We visualize what we will never actually do (James Patterson, for instance, a nice man who has all too often worked the street that my old friend George used to work). Cho doesn't strike me as in the least creative, however. Dude was crazy. Dude was, in the memorable phrasing of Nikki Giovanni, ''just mean.'' Essentially there's no story here, except for a paranoid a--hole who went DEFCON-1. He may have been inspired by Columbine, but only because he was too dim to think up such a scenario on his own.

    On the whole, I don't think you can pick these guys out based on their work, unless you look for violence unenlivened by any real talent."


    --Stephen King
     

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