1. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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    which is the hardest part to write for you?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Tesoro, Jul 1, 2011.

    which is the hardest part for you to write?

    I think we all have some kinds of scenes we feel a little reluctant to write, might be of lack of experience, lack of inspiration of the right kind or the knowledge, it might be because it brings back bad memories or just because we don't know how to best comunicate this thing in a good way.

    Mine is definately sex scenes. I dislike them, both reading and writing, because it's really hard to find/write a good one that doesn't come out as cheap or like some kind of harlekin-cliché/ trying too hard to be romantic (i don't like that either, lol) which only makes it kind of ridiculous imo. I have written one that I liked but usually I skip them, I just write what happens right before and after. and the one I did write was supposed to be a little cheap so that wasn't really an issue (although I do think it turned out quite ok and not as bad as I feared.)

    How do you handle your most difficult scenes? skip them altogether or try to write them anyway even though they never come out as you want them to, with the risk of it taking the whole ms down with it?
     
  2. Leonardo Pisano
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    Leonardo Pisano Active Member

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    The toughest scenes for me to write are narratives where timing is critical.

    Also, as a general remark, I am struggling with the level of detail to present: what to tell/show and what to leave to the imagination of the reader? How obvious is the info presented? But I consider that as part of the fun of writing...
     
  3. MRD
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    MRD Senior Member

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    Probably scenes where there is a lot of action going on, like a medieval battle. I either describe what's happening in too much detail, slowing down what should be a worldwind of fast paced action, or I don't show the reader enough which leads to confused "what's going on" moments.

    While confusion may help create a realistic atmosphere for reader an character alike when it comes to large battles, it's not so useful for smaller tavern brawls and the like.

    It's balancing how much detail to use that I have trouble with, mostly.
     
  4. Leonardo Pisano
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    Leonardo Pisano Active Member

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    #cancelled#
     
  5. Peekaboo
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    Peekaboo New Member

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    Scenes involving an extended dialogue. For me, they're either the easiest or the hardest to write.

    If during an inspirational phase I come up with a conversation between the characters (which happens quite a lot), the writing is effortless. I can basically just transcribe the lines word-for-word, naturally adding in descriptions, dialogue attributions, and actions as I go along, and it will sound great.

    But if the dialogue didn't originate in an inspired moment, I'm horribly stuck. It's really hard for me to craft a convincing and interesting dialogue when the only cue I have is "Mr. X is supposed to inform Ms. Y about this-and-that, and Ms. Y is supposed to be pissed off, and Mr. X is supposed to try to calm her down".

    I usually handle such scenes by just forcing myself to write something down, then moving onto the next scene. It'll sound like crap, but at least I can say I've gotten the first draft done. Later on, if I come up with a better dialogue, I can edit it.
     
  6. FictionAddict
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    FictionAddict Senior Member

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    I'm with you there. Sex scenes are the hardest, but I don't dislike them. The thing is, it's really hard to not be just plain romantic or cheap. If you don't skip the scene, you'll lean towards one or the other. When I manage to get a middle ground, I think it lacks emotion. The thing is to know what do you want to convey, how's the POV experiencing it is like: romantic or bold.

    What I do is write and re-write and re-write more. The more I spend time in this forum, the more I realize that's the answer for everything, btw.

    Oh, and read. That's another answer. LOL.
     
  7. WriterDude
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    WriterDude Contributing Member Contributor

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    I agree, sex scenes are difficult, and usually pointless. If I want some hanky panky in my stories, I usually start with some romance, hint about something more and skip the rest of the scene. If the reader wants the sex scene, he/she can picture them for him/herself much better than I can write them anyway.

    As for the hardest, I think it's funny and scary stuff. Very few people can write them successfully, in my opinion. Everyone has a different opinion on what's funny or scary, and the opinions often change several times over a lifetime. When you are a teenager, you don't care about family as much as you would when you are a newly wed and have a baby or two, and your priorities change again when you get older. Your humor and fears change accordingly.
     
  8. Kio
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    Kio Contributing Member

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    ^ I agree. It's all about subtlety and hints. In literature, sometimes it's best to tease instead of please, in all senses of the word. It doesn't have to involve sex scenes.

    Personally (as in "in my opinion"), the hardest part for me to write would be horror. I can't seem to convey eeriness in words. I always have trouble doing it and, at times, if I try to hard, it turns unintentionally comical. And when I mention horror, I don't mean the ridiculous blood and gore you find in many horror movies. Anyone can write about guts flying and heads rolling. I've done it a number of times.
     
  9. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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  10. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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  11. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    Action scenes for me too. I just can never seem to describe the battle the way I see it in my head.
     
  12. spklvr
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    spklvr Contributing Member Contributor

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    Anytime something fast paced is happening. Battles for instance. Though right now I'm having trouble with a chase scene. He's running through a busy street while being chased by police, and it's horrible. But I keep on going! Practice, practice, practice. It's the only way.

    Sex scenes on the other hand I'm pretty good at, unlike everyone else :p
    It comes with being a crappy slash fanfiction writer.
     
  13. Mallory
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    Mallory Mallegory. Contributor

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    I think transition scenes can be hard. You know, there's the main points of action, but then there's the stuff between each one. I want to make everything seem fast-paced and not like filler, so finding a transition that's also exciting for people to read can be challenging.
     
  14. Liza
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    Liza Active Member

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    Journeys. Like, getting from one place to another.I think I always move too fast, and I usually just skip the getting around part.
     
  15. Mallory
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    Mallory Mallegory. Contributor

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    ^ Just throw in some action, creepy moments, and/or tension or humor between characters to spice up said journey, and you'll be good. :)
     
  16. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I found that, unless some critical plot thing happens during a journey, I should just leave it out. "Two weeks later, haggard, thirsty, and saddlesore, they arrived in Smith Canyon ..." That's all I need. I mean, if you're writing an epic and feel like indulging yourself, go ahead and spend thousands and thousands of words describing the journey. But then, go back and see if the story might be actually a bit stronger if you cut all that stuff out.
     
  17. dizzyspell
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    dizzyspell Active Member

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    Introducing action in the middle of a scene.

    One of the hardest scenes I've had to write is one where my MC is at dinner with his wife and they start getting shot at. That change in tone was really difficult for me, as was displaying the suddenness of the event without using the word "suddenly."

    I think I've got the hang of it now, though. I hope so!
     
  18. WriterDude
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    WriterDude Contributing Member Contributor

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    Agreed. The trick is to first make the reader care about the character, and then start building up a scene to let him/her know something is about to happen. To be successful, you need to buiid it up enough to let it run on autopilot, so to say, but not so much that you tell everything. The characters taking their clothes off and heading to the shower is fine, but you don't need to tell what's going on in the shower. Mmmm....oooh... conditioner... peach flavored.... lovely... :D

    But can you write sex scenes without Jensen Ackles? Haha! :D
     
  19. spklvr
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    spklvr Contributing Member Contributor

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    When I think about it, that's actually a pretty big problem for me too. I often skip the transition. If they are going from one place to another, I just stop the scene and start at the new place. Don't know if that's actually a good thing. I mean, if you got nothing to say about what happens on the way, why even bother having it in the story.
     
  20. spklvr
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    spklvr Contributing Member Contributor

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    Oh please! I have only written one or two or three... fanfics about him :D
    Cas is usually his co-star. Yes, I'm one of THOSE people.
     
  21. Florent150
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    Florent150 Member

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    It has to be action scenes for me. I think I can set the scene well, but it causes lots of problems for me with show vs tell. I feel like showing everything slows the pace too much, whereas telling makes it read very poorly. I have trouble getting the flow correct in action/battle scenes.

    I also have a poor time opening stories properly and setting the scene; at least for the very first chapter of a new story. I can start chapters, sequels, prequels etc no problem. But for some reason introducing a brand new story I find difficult; I often write the second chapter first and move on from there.
     
  22. Sundae
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    Sundae Contributing Member

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    Childhood scenes are hard for me. It's easy to write in retrospect because I have all the knowledge of an adult looking back at the younger years, but writing full scenes in which I have write the way a child talks and thinks are gruesome.

    I struggled with a bully scene involving four kids ages 7 - 8 for weeks recently. It was difficult finding a way to carry the scene out so that it didn't appear as the typical cliche.
     
  23. sidtvicious
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    sidtvicious Contributing Member Contributor

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    Writing can be emotionally draining for me, I once killed off a character and couldn't write for a good week afterward. I felt so bad, like I had gotten too far into her destroyers head enough taht it sickened me.
     
  24. PastPresentNFuture
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    PastPresentNFuture Senior Member

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    Its a bit hard to write scenes in depressing places. These include apocalyptic ruins, slums, areas with dead bodies pilled up etc. The images then pile up in my head, and then they can be a bit jarring.
     
  25. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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    yes, there is the mentally challenging aspect of it too, and not just the technical one. some parts are definitely draining to write because they make you feel bad, but then If you do hopefully it means you have been quite successful in picturing it for the reader.
     

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