1. CobaltLion
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    CobaltLion Member

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    Word Cap

    Discussion in 'The Art of Critique' started by CobaltLion, Sep 11, 2008.

    I have a short horror story that I recently finished and just got through proofreading. I'm considering trying to get it published in an ezine or magazine at the moment, but I wanted to get some feedback through the review system.

    My question is: Is there a limit to the number of words that can be posted in the review area? My story is currently at nine pages (single spaced) and just shy of 6000 words. (5,736 to be exact.) Is this too long to post? I'd very much like to get some reactions on it, but not if it's going to be a burden for others to read.
     
  2. Heather Louise
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    Heather Louise Contributing Member Contributor

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    To be honest with you, Cobalt Lion, it is a bit long for someone to read all in one go. What I would suggest to you, is to post the parts of it you are struggling most with, see what reviews you get on that section, and apply it to the rest fo your work as sometimes a lot of the mistakes made are repeats.

    Otherwise, you could just post it all, possibly in two or three posts, and see if anyone wants to read it all. :)

    Heather
     
  3. Sir
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    Sir New Member

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    I don't promise to get through the whole thing, depends on how much I like it, but if you want to email it to me I'll take a whack at it.
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    If you plan on publishing it, you shouldn't post it.

    I'd also recommend caution in regards to mailing it to strangers. Do the best you can on your own, and then enlist someone you know well and trust to take a pass at it.

    When you get rejections, and it's likely that you will, pay close attention to any information that might come back with the rejection letter. While you wait for the letters, study up on the areas of writing you feel you are weakest in. Strunk and White is great, and many consider it the best. I prefer a larger variety of sources (including Strunk and White, also the Chicago Manual of Style - a massive tome!)

    Having someone else proof for you won't help your writing nearly as much as studying and being your own harshest critic!
     

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