1. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    Words ...

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by cutecat22, Jun 14, 2015.

    Been discussing some words that sound the same but have similar spellings and multiple meanings on another thread so I thought I would start a new thread for them, here.

    As well as the usual their, there, they're, words that came up, were things like:

    draught and draft (cold draft, draught beer)
    plough and plow (plow through the snow, plough the field)

    A lot will be the difference between US English and UK English but can you come up with any more?
     
  2. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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  3. Tim3232
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    Tim3232 Active Member

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    Sometimes I avoid using the words taught, tort and taut because they sound the same. Does that make me homophonic?
     
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  4. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Like bow and bow? Tie a bow and shoot a bow and arrow?
     
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  5. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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  6. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Yeah that's cheating. I'm telling on your Mum.
     
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  7. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    What is interesting with true homonyms, is that when reading them in a sentence, our brains know exactly how to pronounce them correctly for their place and meaning in the sentence. Take bow and bow.

    Jamie sprinted to the bow of the boat with his bow held aloft, ready for action. All he needed to do, was place the arrow on a moving target from a moving craft. He felt the movement of the bow under his feet, reached for an arrow and took aim.
    The bow's string brushed over his cheek as he held his breath and released it.
    "Well done, Jamie," his instructor told him as he joined him on deck. "Perfect shot, take a bow ..."
     
  8. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    No, it just means you don't know the difference between tort, taught and taut.
     
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  9. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Take a bow from a bough but make sure you maintain your balance!
     
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  10. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    How are you pronouncing these words to make "tort" sound like the other two?!?
     
  11. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Ah really? Tort, taught and taut all sound the same to me.
     
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  12. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    But there's a test I took, somewhere, for something... details are foggy, obviously... that showed that I was having to slow down or read over or something when there were homonyms. I'm a strong reader- it wasn't a test to show a deficiency, just to show that it's a common issue. I wish I could remember more about it...
     
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  13. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    In UK English, those three are pronounced the same. Tart, is pronounced with the arr sound. The others are all pronounced tort.
     
  14. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    I can understand the need for slowing down when the words are spelled the same. If there's a spelling difference (tort/taught/taut) then it's obvious when reading, to see the meaning of the word.
     
  15. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    They do but they all have different meanings:

    Tort - a legal term. (a tort is a civil wrong that unfairly causes someone else to suffer loss or harm)
    Taut - tight but not to the point of strangulation. (The rope connected to the boat was pulled taut)
    Taught - the past tense of teach. (I was taught how to sew at school)
     
  16. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    Do you have an "r" sound in taught, or no "r" sound in tort?
     
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  17. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    No r sound in tort.
     
  18. Tim3232
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    Tim3232 Active Member

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    If I google each of those words I get the option to listen to the word pronounced - in an American accent. So, I see how you pronounce each. For me I say tort, taught and taut exactly the same. No 'r'.
     
  19. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    :D

    I was taught about torts when I did a small business diploma 15 years ago or so, when we briefly covered the 4 pillars of contract law.
     
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  20. BayView
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    I spent three years in law school, and it was always pronounced with the R sound.

    Canada - sometimes we follow American standards, sometimes we follow British standards. Every now and then we make up our own weird shit!

    But, having listened to the different pronunciations, I think it's actually the vowel sounds that are confusing things. The UK version drags the vowels out so long there's not really room to hear whether the R is there or not! Interesting.
     
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  21. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Pronouncing r's is very French, though. MDR is a classic example of said Rrrrrr :D
     
  22. Tim3232
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    Tim3232 Active Member

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    I've never been called a vowel dragger before. Should I be wearing women's clothes to do that?

    But then tort is such an abrupt word, I hear no vowel dragging. And then taught and taut pronounced the same, so vowel dragging?
     
  23. Aaron DC
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    Aaron DC Contributing Member

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    Like knuckle dragging but your arms don't have to be as long.

    :whistle:
     
  24. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    Not like in Tart - of the fruit and pastry variety.
     
  25. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    So you do know the difference o_O
     

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