1. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    World-Building by Stephen Lee Gillett

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by GingerCoffee, May 7, 2016.

    Someone else recommended this book and I'm sorry I've forgotten who that is so I can't give them credit.

    World-building by Stephen Lee Gillett

    It's a planetary science for the lay person as it relates to science fiction world building. I know a lot about planetary science, as it's one of my hobby sciences. But there was a lot of useful information for me in the book.

    For example the planet in my world has a ring. It never dawned on me I should build in the effect of the shade the ring would cast on my planet's temperature and seasons. And there's a discussion about how certain elements might end up concentrated in the soil in different locations on a planet. The underclass in my novel just got some toxins added to the part of the city they've been relegated to.

    It's about the science, not fantasy, but highly recommended.
     
  2. newjerseyrunner
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    Great world building is something I always enjoy in good science fiction. Probably why I loved Contact by Carl Sagan so much, he was literally a planetary scientist.

    If anyone has any questions about the workings of planets like that, I should be able to answer them or at very least know someone who will. I'm often annoyed by soft science fiction that describes planetary features that couldn't possibly exist. For example, your ring system would not only affect the climate of the planet, but ring systems are generally unstable (Saturn's are so bright because the lost material is constantly being replenished by one of it's moons, Jupiter's you wouldn't even see.)
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2016
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  3. Shattered Shields
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    Shattered Shields Gratsa!

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    Wait wait wait. Would this book cover things like climate? Perhaps how ocean currents and geographic features affect weather?
     
  4. GingerCoffee
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    For the most part it is about planetary science rather than Earth science. But there is a chapter on Earth science that has some of what you ask about.

    It's got some great stuff, ideas for planetary science that sci-fi stories might be based on.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
  5. Shattered Shields
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    Shattered Shields Gratsa!

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    Oh dang it. I'll buy it anyways then. Sounds like a good read. Thanks for the recommendation!
     
  6. GingerCoffee
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    Sorry, see my edits. It's full of great stuff for the sci-fi writer. You will not be disappointed if you buy it. That is, if you are looking for scientific accuracy.
     
  7. Shattered Shields
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    Shattered Shields Gratsa!

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    Well, I might dabble in some sic fi (my first book is actually going to be in the genre), but want I really want is tips on fantasy world building. Cultures and climates both so that things make sense.
     

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