1. Sato Ayako
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    Sato Ayako Contributing Member

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    Writers & Inevitabilities

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Sato Ayako, Mar 9, 2009.

    Does anyone here have a quirk, habit, etc. that will express itself, no matter what?

    For example, I've noticed a nasty little quirk of mine that, despite my best efforts, I've been unable to quash. In fact, after living with it for over six years, it doesn't even bother me anymore. Whenever I start a new novel or story, it is a guarantee that I will drop that project. Actually, I'll drop anywhere from one to three projects before I settle on one that I can write.

    Another inevitability of mine is killing off characters. At least one character in my novels (though not always in my short stories), will die. Frequently, several will die. I've also been known to kill off a whole cast just because the plot leads that way.
     
  2. Rave
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    Rave New Member

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    I tend to drop a lot of projects too. As for killing off characters, why not try setting up writing exercises for yourself that specifically require avoiding the death of characters? Just random exercises.
     
  3. Gone Wishing
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    Gone Wishing Contributing Member

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    The only thing that recurs when I write is a particular theme.

    I rather have an obsession with obsession, apparently, and every other theme that is evident in my writing is something of a mechanic to explore obsession further... o_O
     
  4. tehuti88
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    tehuti88 Contributing Member

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    My stories will almost inevitably turn into monstrously long, multipart, character-driven epics.

    I've just learned to accept this. Long, character-driven epic serials are what I seem to be made to write. Even with shorter works like novels and novellas/short stories, they run in series and/or tie in to the serials. I just can't do the whole standalone thing with characters I never use again. I guess it's a waste to develop a character and then use them for only one story. (Even if they get killed, the repercussions of who they were tend to remain in future stories. If they don't show up in spirit form or something. *shrug*)

    That, and certain themes, as was mentioned. Jungian ideas regularly creep into my work now. That's just how it goes.
     
  5. love2listen
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    love2listen Member

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    Most of what I've written over the last three years has a central plot focus around DJs, clubs, raves etc, because I am a DJ and its a huge part of my life.

    The Residency (and its sequel which I never finished) are films that tell the story of a 17 year old DJ who drops out of high school to move to a large city for a residency at a club.

    Sweet Ibiza is a romance novel about a woman vacationing in Ibiza in summer and she falls in love with a local DJ, who decides to leave his career.

    Movement is a radio serial soap (only wrote 5 episodes!) about the clubbers and DJs at the nightclub Movement.

    The Day The Sky Turned Neon is an autobiography of the 7 months I spent at a club, during which I fell in love with the owner/manager/resident DJ.
     
  6. Aeroflot
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    Aeroflot Senior Member

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    For a while all my stories revolved around a man committing adultery, but I've dropped those because the moral ended up being 'adultery is fine' and I doubt most publications will accept something like that. For some reason my stories turn into bastions of immorality.
     
  7. Honeybun
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    Honeybun Active Member

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    Hmmm...well, that's actually not uncommon. I think, in some cases, if not most, it's best to cast them away till further notice. The thing is, will there ever be one? It's best if you deiced before hand and look for what motivates you most. Determination is a key factor to continuing a writing.

    I've had the same experience, but I made myself go back more than once, freshen up what I've been working on, and notice that I've come up with new ideas, and pick it up from there.


    Keep it up ;)
     
  8. g1ng3rsnap9ed
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    g1ng3rsnap9ed Contributing Member

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    My main characters tend to be teenage girls. I think that this is because I write what I know and I'm a teen (unfortunately). I find most boys my age unbearable, so I hate to write about them.

    I always have death in my stories, ranging from inhuman barbarities to natural causes.

    I hate writing about the real-world.

    I always have two main characters who are best-friends. This is probably b/c I'm so close to my best friend.
     
  9. Rave
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    Rave New Member

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    I have the same problem, I almost always write female characters, I identify with them best. The thing is the usually have a lot of masculine qualities, but they're still chicks.

    The odd thing is, I'm good at being all guru and sage like for people about relationship issues relating to both men and women, but I can't write from a man's perspective.

    Hm...
     
  10. Dr. Doctor
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    Dr. Doctor Contributing Member

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    I always put in **** like this:
    I don't really know what to call it, but I'm trying to stop; I need more original ways of expressing a "journey."
     
  11. g1ng3rsnap9ed
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    g1ng3rsnap9ed Contributing Member

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    I try writing as men and can somewhat get them right, but women are so much easier for me to connect with. Sorta odd since I'm a total loner who hardly talks to chicks, but its that way all the same. Actually, that may have a lot to do with it...And I'm off for another good 'ole self-examination! :D
     
  12. Mercurial
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    Mercurial Contributing Member Contributor

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    I have a hard time limitting the sarcasm. No matter what it is --novel, essay, poem, or even a letter... those who know my writing can spot its author immediately. :rolleyes:

    I guess that's a good thing, right? My writing is distinguishable? However, I'd much rather be recognized for my quality than my obvious sarcasm. :p
     
  13. architectus
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    architectus Banned

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    Something I have noticed that shows up in a lot of my stories is glowing colors like neon lights, glowing liquids, etc.

    I like Vegas for this reason.
     
  14. Rave
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    Rave New Member

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    You use small staccato sentence structures a lot. Try visualising the scene, and make a heirachy of what's most important, for example, in this case, there's a fight going on, yep, check, then the ship is on fire, check, and then the sea is stormy, check. There's your heirachy. Get the most important bits laid down and then work on adding details and frilly bits etc.
     
  15. Nilfiry
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    Nilfiry Contributing Member

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    This, but not always multipart. I'm working on a story at the moment that I'm not going to bother to break up so it's going to be a ridiculously thick book when I finish. I don't mind it since I like long and complex plots. Maybe it's one of the reasons why I don't do short stories. tee hee

    Another thing that I always do is add allusions to things that I like. They are usually subtle, but sometimes I make them obvious and important. I may mention the name of a song that I really like by stating that it is playing in the background of a bar or something, or I may make it so that the song is a key to solving a crime.

    I only write fantasy type stories, the main characters of these stories are always both smart and strong from the very beginning, there is always a phoenix in some form be it live or just a drawing, and there are always cameos from other stories on related timelines.

    There are some other things I can't remember, but those are the main ones. Oh, and there is always romance no matter how little.
     
  16. iolair
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    iolair Active Member

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    While I'm sure it could be improved, I've read much worse in print...
     
  17. Dr. Doctor
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    Dr. Doctor Contributing Member

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    I just meant **** as in, stuff. I think it's pretty good, although I'm trying to improve in the way that the first guy who commented said. And what was wrong with it was not the sentence structure, but the execution. Got a plot you need to resolve and can't find a way to do so? Use a verbose and vaguely supernatural/drug-influenced cop out sequence to make everything right again. I've done it too many times.

    Rave: Thanks for the advice. :cool: I'm going to try it out.
     

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