1. aguywhotypes
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    aguywhotypes Active Member

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    Writer's Questions; list/book?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by aguywhotypes, Jun 5, 2015.

    I'm looking for questions you ask yourself when writing.

    The famous one of course is what if? I want a bunch of others. I think that would help me the most. I'm so blocked up right now I can't even think of questions to ask.

    something along this :

    http://writetodone.com/5-key-questions-to-ask-as-you-write-your-novel/

    I want tons more like this.

    Are there any books that have tons of lists of questions?
     
  2. Hannah0113
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    Hannah0113 Member

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    I love questions like this! They can be so helpful.

    What is the protagonist's view on a certain subject (such as the central point of the story)? What are the supporting characters' view on it?

    Why did the protagonist get his/her role - what makes this person unique/important enough to be the main character?

    How do the characters grow throughout the story? Why were they able to do so?

    If there is a narrator, is his/her role simply that and nothing more, or is the narrator somehow connected to the story?
     
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  3. Sweetness11
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    Sweetness11 New Member

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    Is this any good?

    :)
     
  4. izzybot
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    izzybot Human Disaster Contributor

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    I don't remember anymore where I found this list, but:

    Before anything else, ensure that your protagonist has a solid, working character arc. How do you do this? By asking the following questions:

    What do they want? What is the reader rooting for?
    Why is what they want important? Why do they need it now?
    What’s stopping them?
    How have they changed at the end of the book, as a result of these challenges?
    And most importantly: why will a reader care?

    Once you’ve identified the spine of the story, check your conflict.

    Are the obstacles to your protagonist’s goal big enough?
    Are they scalable?
    Does the conflict gradually and inevitably escalate throughout the novel?
    Does your story climax involve the most powerful conflict possible, in terms of story goal?​

    Might be of help.
     
  5. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Firstly, I'm a planner, not a pantser, so...

    I ask myself:

    1. Why am I writing this story? What am I try to say - at a core, fundamental level - with this tale?
    2. How does the objective of my MC satisfy the above the question?
    3. (later in the writing) I'm I still on track with the above two questions?
      • If no:
        • Was it my choice of which I am aware and cognizant, this change of course?
          • If yes:
            • Continue
          • If no:
            • Am I okay with what seems this new course?
              • If yes:
                • Continue
              • If no:
              • Is there a even a course now? Have I gotten lost in the tell and I don't really know where this is going anymore?
                • If yes:
                  • Stop writing. Now. Go back to my original course and reevaluate why I was writing this in the first place. Get back on course.
     
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  6. Burlbird
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    Burlbird Contributing Member Contributor

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    For me there is one great big ultimate question:

    Why?

    :)

    I use it all the time, and in all and every occasion. From macro to micro level. Why do I write? Why do I write this? Why does this character/plot/theme interest me? Why Times New Roman? Why do I use "say" instead of "utter"? Why is this sentence here, not there? Why are these doors red? Why is the wall white? Why does Sir Mannos need to visit the capital and rent the cheapest whore instead of joining the covenant? Why do I need God? Why not finish here instead of writing that useless epilogue? Why oh why?
     

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