1. nastyjman
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    nastyjman Contributing Member

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    Writing Mindset

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by nastyjman, May 8, 2013.

    There is the advice that says, "turn off the editor inside, and write your story." Doing so will help writers who suffer from writer's block and who are frozen in the first sentence, tweaking it, changing a word and not going beyond the first sentence. This advice had helped me slog through a phase where I couldn't go beyond the first sentence or first paragraph. I reserved my editorial critique for the second draft.

    Sure, shut that editor out for the first draft, but I'm curious if you invite someone else in your writer's mind. Do you get into character and write through the chosen POV character's eyes? I haven't done this process yet. What I do now is write as the author and only as the author.

    I'm curious if any of you fellow writers get into character while you write. Character would not be limited to first-person; character can also be third-person.
     
  2. Thomas Kitchen
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    Thomas Kitchen Proofreader in the Making Contributor

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    I'll be honest and say I've only ever written as the author, seeing what's ahead and what will happen; seeing the inside of other characters' heads. But what you propose is certainly interesting, and I will have to try it for my next novel. Granted I don't have an answer for you, but thanks for giving me that advice! :p
     
  3. Youniquee
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    Youniquee (◡‿◡✿) Contributor

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    I definitely get into character, since I'm writing in first person. I have to pretend I'm a grumpy, slightly spiteful teenage guy who has completely different ideals from me lol It's hard because I haven't experience some things he has but at the same time, it's fun and a nice challenge.
     
  4. squishytheduck
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    squishytheduck Senior Member

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    It's not a conscious decision on my part, but yes. I am in the mind of the character, no matter what the POV. I see the setting as they see it, and react to events of the plot as they would if it were happening to them. It's a weird feeling and difficult to snap out of, but I think it helps me write believable dialog and sensorial, evocative imagery. There should be a term for this... method writing, maybe?
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    ditto what squishy said... to write believably, i believe one has to be somewhat 'inside' each character... otherwise, they'll be stiff and unreal... and/or all be too much like the author... i'd be very surprised if successful fiction writers don't do this either consciously or automatically...
     
  6. muscle979
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    muscle979 Member

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    Every character is the star of the show in his/her own mind so you have to find a way to channel that to make them believable.
     
  7. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    I find it greatly aids in characterisation. I automatically write not from the POV of but as though I had the personality of the most prominent character in that particular scene, not so much in terms of the writing style itself but how the scene and other character's actions are described. To take one example: Jack would walk into a room and see everyone's faces and how they look at him, whereas Cael will walk into the same room and see where they're all positioned and who they're looking at. It's just another dimension of the 'showing' in 'showing and telling.' Something tells me I'm describing this abysmally, so I'll show you the same scene twice written not from the perspective of but as though it were the characters in question narrating it:

    You can tell a lot about the characters' personalities from how they'd describe that room, yet it's not directly them describing it, if that makes sense. As long as this connection between the narrative and the character's viewpoints is implicit from the beginning of a novel, you can add a whole new dimension to characterisation with it.
     
  8. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I find it difficult not to write in character. If I try, I get something that looks like a newspaper report. I rarely write in first person, though, and never for anything longer than a short story. It's too annoying; I can't easily switch POVs between scenes, and I'm restricted to the vocabulary and voice of my character. Third person limited allows me to be inside my character's head while using my own voice - best of both worlds, I think.
     

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