1. koal4e
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    koal4e Member

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    Writing Style

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by koal4e, May 20, 2012.

    Hi all,

    Im a writer by trade, self employed to write the web content for websites and news for online news portals. Now I have turned to writing my own novel based on a fantasy style swords and all story in my head. The problem I am facing is the writing style of my novel.

    I have so far only written 2,000 words, these are pretty much the precursor/brief history to the story just to outline the start of the novel. My concern is that while I feel my writing style is okay, I am worried about how much level of descrption needs to be incorporated, maybe I am overthinking but I feel that I may not be giving enough....then I worry I am putting too much.

    Am I worrying too much, should I simply write my story and revisit once reading through my first draft for corrections?

    Thanks for listening!
     
  2. Youniquee
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    Youniquee (◡‿◡✿) Contributor

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    Yes. If you keep worrying, then nothing is going to get done! Write how you want to now, not minding if the description is to small or too much. Then in the editing process, you'll notice if you need more or less description and correct it. It's not going to be perfect in the first draft anyway so~ Just write.
    That's my advice on it.

    I hope that helped.
     
  3. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    All novels are works in progress. I suggest you simply keep writing. t he end of each chapter, look it over and see how it feels - is there not enough or too much description, does dialogue sound realistic, pacing, in short - is this something you'd like to read.
    There'll be a long time between starting and finishing the novel, in that time, you can fix it all in stages.
     
  4. koal4e
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    koal4e Member

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    Thanks for your comments, Ill keep writing...it just felt that part of the opening seemed a little short in description, but as you say I can revisit later on :)
     
  5. killbill
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    killbill Contributing Member

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    Outline by definition should be brief, something to help you plan the plot or sub-plot. So, it doesn't make sense to write heavy descriptions in the outline. If you are saying you are writing outside of the novel about the setting of your fantasy world for your own personal understanding of the world then go ahead and write all the descriptions you can think of. But when it comes to writing the actual novel only write what is neccessary for the readers to understand your story's world, and don't info dump them in one chapter, give them in bits and pieces whenever it is relevant as the story progress.
     
  6. marcuslam
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    marcuslam Senior Member

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    I think it's fine to just write the amount that feels right for you. Then, some people will say that's great, while others will complain that it's too much or too little. That's just the way it's going to be. Of course, you can get a more united view by spending twenty pages describing a chair :D.
     
  7. koal4e
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    koal4e Member

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    Good advice, I think I will keep the outline as it is...the rest will unravel in the book (which may end up being multiple books as only one part of the story will make the first novel at this rate!)
     
  8. PeterC
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    PeterC Active Member

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    Don't worry about not having enough description at first. It's possible you'll end up deleting or massively reworking scenes anyway. Don't agonize over every detail now only to throw it all away later.
     
  9. killbill
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    killbill Contributing Member

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    Make sure that each book in a series has its own story arc. You can't have all the conflict built up in one book and the resolutions in the next book. I am not saying you are doing it, but FYI just in case. The character development may continue throughout the series, though. So, keeping all these in mind I think it is best for you to concentrate fully only on the first book.
     
  10. indy5live
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    indy5live Active Member

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    How basic is too basic? No such thing. Get the story on paper in whatever form works best for you. If that means writing a one liner for each chapter and thinking in your mind, what next, then do it that way. If it means writing just the dialog between characters that you know will take place then start there. If you are more of a news writer/journalist, stay objective and treat each chapter as an event that you're reporting on (what took place, with who, when, where, why, etc). I just started outlining my second novel today, here is what I started with:

    Chapter 1: Cop called by FBI to investigate a similar crime to the one he just finished, brief cop and introduce conflict.
    Chapter 2: Key witness is at the hospital visiting with a counselor about the traumatic event.
    Chapter 3: Cop pays a visit to the affiliated. Learn about the affiliate past and their relationship to current event.
    Chapter 4: Another death needs to take place, related to the key witness.
    etc.
     
  11. jg22
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    If you are setting a (new) scene, creating atmosphere or mood, using symbolism or writing significant action, then use as much descriptive detail as you like. If you are connecting one scene with another, transitioning from one place to another (characters travelling about, for example), or describing the gist of events through the passage of time, then I would be terse with the amount of detail used.
     

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