1. wordwizard
    Offline

    wordwizard Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Vancouver Island

    yikes ouch help

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by wordwizard, Jan 20, 2009.

    i burnt my finger so bad tht it sizzled!

    any ideas on taking away the pain other than keeping it under cold water and icing it????

    it has been 10 min....and is still unbearable



    yeowza
     
  2. wordwizard
    Offline

    wordwizard Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    i am trying a wet napkin and it helps until the coldness goes away. thank you for your ideas though.

    p.s. hard not to think about it when it is stinging like crazy. But advice is appreciated and noted.
     
  3. Aristocrazy
    Offline

    Aristocrazy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    one time when I was in elementry school I decided to make hot chocolate in the microwave so I put it in a thermos with the lid on so that it wouldn't boil over (brilliant deduction eh?)

    when I took it out of the microwave and opened the lid it literally flew around the room... and I got myself two completely scalded hands

    good times
     
  4. wordwizard
    Offline

    wordwizard Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    LMAO.... That does not sound like fun.

    I hate these new stoves...they are the ones with no raised elements..and when they are off they are no longer red to show that they are hot.....I forgot and stuck my finger on it to pick up a hashbrown .lol......

    The only indicator that it is hot is on the display panel where it says HS....for hot surface.......

    ridiculous.
     
  5. Carmina
    Offline

    Carmina Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,909
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Woodland California
    The treatment depends on the severity of the burn. If it is red, but not blistered, you can use sunburn treatment like Solarcaine (which contains lidocaine like what you get at the dentist). You can also use aloevera gel. it will help sooth the burn. In the short term, water is the best way to get it to stop burning. If it is blistered, you may want to add an antibiotic ointment to your list of remedies to ward off infection. If it hurts, that is a good sign. The most serious burns are painless as the nerves have been burned away.
     
  6. Aristocrazy
    Offline

    Aristocrazy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    my aunt has one of those. I also find them annoying to clean when you spill on them as you have to make sure you dont scratch them or whatever. assuming your a bachelor like me whose priority isn't to clean the elements asap... >.>
     
  7. wordwizard
    Offline

    wordwizard Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    it is blistered so putting on some cream is a good idea. It is still unbearable,but my solution so far is one layer of wet napkin, then icecube secured in place with more wet napkin.

    thanks everybody!
     
  8. NaCl
    Offline

    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,855
    Likes Received:
    58
    Ouch!

    If it is blistered...do NOT break the skin. Over time, your body will re-absorb the fluid under the blistered skin and the "dead" skin on top will slough off naturally after a new layer of skin has formed underneath. Risk of infection begins the moment the skin breaks. The best thing you can do now is to wrap the burned area under some kind of bandage to protect it from accidentally breaking open. I would also put a thin coating of an anit-biotic cream (like Neosporin) on the skin before bandaging it...that way, if/when the skin finally punctures, the antibiotic is already in place.

    Good luck.
     
  9. Wreybies
    Offline

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    18,915
    Likes Received:
    10,108
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    True! Heed Saulty's words. We're such curious little monkeys and we have to pick at every little thing that looks out of place, but Saulty is correct. Think of the blister as nature's bandage.
     
  10. perylousdemon
    Offline

    perylousdemon Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Do you have any aloe around? That helps with sunburn, so it might help with a regular burn as well. Otherwise, keep doing what you're doing, and I hope you feel better soon.
     
  11. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    It may be a good idea to check with your doctor. A few weeks ago, I splattered hot cooking oil on my wrist while browning a roast. I had the arm under cold water in less than 5 seconds, so the damage was confined to the topmost layer of skin, but when I had a routine unrelated appointment a few days later, that doctor sent me to the ER for burn treatment anyway. They geve me a tetanus booster, dressed the burns with an ointment of silver sulfadiazine, and put me on antibiotics for the week.

    If your burns aren't blistering (and exposing raw skin), you may not need as much treatment, but the still may have you use the silver sulfadiazene or similar ointment to make sure the damage is minimized.
     
  12. Jack
    Offline

    Jack Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Messages:
    479
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Canada
    Ouch! You must have been in so much pain Cogito and wordwizard!

    Once when I was younger, I remembered vividly that I grabbed a steaming hot pan of eggs (because my mother wanted me to bring it over to her). Less than two seconds later... I dropped the pan and the eggs bounced off and landed on the floor. My mother was rather upset and shocked. Meanwhile, I was bawling my eyes out and I thought to myself. “MOM QUICK, SEND ME TO THE HOSPITAL, I MIGHT DIE". Luckily, it was only minor injuries.
     
  13. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    don't have time to read all the replies, so i'll just tell you what i KNOW always works...

    keep an ice pack [frozen peas are best/cheapest] on it till the cold hurts more than the burn... then when the burn pain returns, put the icepack back on... for some burns, you have to keep doing this for a long time... may even have to sleep with the pack on the burn... when the burn no longer hurts after the pack is removed, it'll be pretty much healed... and you'll get no blistering, if you get the ice on it right away...

    i've treated some pretty bad burns this way and it's never failed to work...
     
  14. ManicParroT
    Offline

    ManicParroT Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    2
    Small burns are fine, but as Cogito's story points out, big burns can be serious business. I've talked to ER doctors and they hate treating burns. They honestly prefer gunshot wounds, because burns are so hard to treat, and success rates are so low.

    I'd avoid directly using an icepack - wrap it in a damp, clean, non-fluffy cloth or something. Direct exposure to very cold temperatures could damage the tissue.
     
  15. Torana
    Offline

    Torana Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    9,659
    Likes Received:
    128
    One thing I found great for burns is Aloe Vera. But foolow maia's and Cogito's advice. They have had lots of experience. I was told that aloe vera is good, but make sure to keep cold comperesses on affected areas, damp cloths every few minutes, and once it isn't so bad, keep moistuire to area to stoip scarring. Moisturiser is good to use in healing process.

    My son has a sever scold on his face and you can't tell what so ever now. We used burn swabs covered in burn aid cream. The area is burnt, meaning all tissue is void of moisture. You cooked it. So try to add moisture to area, slowly though. Not to any great extreme. Cold compresses and burn aid ointment/creams, help loads as well as aloe vera. Coming from a heath line. nurses and 2 doctors.
     
  16. lessa
    Offline

    lessa Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,917
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    Fantasy land
    speaking from experience with burns.
    my husband is a welder and the thing they use for burns is a cream with Zinc in it.
    they keep applying it as the cream helps the skin not dry out and the zinc works on
    the burn itself taking away the pain.
    Vitamin E oil is also good but very expensive.
    my sister had a huge coffee urn tip over and her back was scalded. Dad started pouring Vit. E oil on it and she does not have any scars and her back should be completely scared.
    But Zinc is the best.
     
  17. wordwizard
    Offline

    wordwizard Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Great advice everybody!
    Thanks so much.
     
  18. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    sorry, i forgot to add that you need to wrap a dish towel around the ice pack... and the reason it works is that the cold keeps the white blood cells from rushing to the scene of the injury, which is what makes it blister and causes much of the pain...
     

Share This Page