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  1. Zombie Among Us

    Zombie Among Us Active Member

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    Bacterial Infection?

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Zombie Among Us, Dec 29, 2018.

    In my story, an existing bacterial infection is altered in a lab to become a deadly plague. I need an existing bacterial infection that has the following characteristics:

    -Can cause sepsis/septic shock/organ failure
    -Has an existing, known cure, or one could easily be discovered
    -At least mildly contagious

    I was thinking the bacteria known as Streptococcus pneumoniae (or pneumococcus) might work, but I couldn't find anything on a cure, just a vaccine. Anyone know if a cure exists/could be made? Maybe a different bacteria that could work? Thanks.
     
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  2. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Pneumococcus is treatable with antibiotics.

    You might want to go with MRSA. It's treatable (only HA MRSA is hard to treat but it is still treatable).

    And you might want to manipulate the PVL or Panton-Valentine leukocidin component of MRSA that resulted in the organism being more easily acquired. PVL has spread worldwide in only a decade or so.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2018
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  3. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    Another element OP could look at is how long the stuff stays alive in the air. Some infections are more contagious within three feet, because they die in the air quickly (droplet transmission-MRSA) while others do not (Airborne-TB).

    Infection Routes and Precautions:
    III.B.2. Droplet precautions.
    Droplet Precautions are intended to prevent transmission of pathogens spread through close respiratory or mucous membrane contact with respiratory secretions as described in I.B.3.b. Because these pathogens do not remain infectious over long distances in a healthcare facility, special air handling and ventilation are not required to prevent droplet transmission. Infectious agents for which Droplet Precautions are indicated are found in Appendix A and include B. pertussis, influenza virus, adenovirus, rhinovirus, N. meningitides, and group A streptococcus (for the first 24 hours of antimicrobial therapy). A single patient room is preferred for patients who require Droplet Precautions. When a single-patient room is not available, consultation with infection control personnel is recommended to assess the various risks associated with other patient placement options (e.g., cohorting, keeping the patient with an existing roommate). Spatial separation of ≥3 feet and drawing the curtain between patient beds is especially important for patients in multi-bed rooms with infections transmitted by the droplet route. Healthcare personnel wear a mask (a respirator is not necessary) for close contact with infectious patient; the mask is generally donned upon room entry. Patients on Droplet Precautions who must be transported outside of the room should wear a mask if tolerated and follow Respiratory Hygiene/Cough Etiquette.

    Top of Page

    III.B.3. Airborne precautions.
    Airborne Precautions prevent transmission of infectious agents that remain infectious over long distances when suspended in the air (e.g., rubeola virus [measles], varicella virus [chickenpox], M. tuberculosis, and possibly SARS-CoV) as described in I.B.3.c and Appendix A. The preferred placement for patients who require Airborne Precautions is in an airborne infection isolation room (AIIR). An AIIR is a single-patient room that is equipped with special air handling and ventilation capacity that meet the American Institute of Architects/Facility Guidelines Institute (AIA/FGI) standards for AIIRs (i.e., monitored negative pressure relative to the surrounding area, 12 air exchanges per hour for new construction and renovation and 6 air exchanges per hour for existing facilities, air exhausted directly to the outside or recirculated through HEPA filtration before return).12, 13 Some states require the availability of such rooms in hospitals, emergency departments, and nursing homes that care for patients with M. tuberculosis. A respiratory protection program that includes education about use of respirators, fit-testing, and user seal checks is required in any facility with AIIRs. In settings where Airborne Precautions cannot be implemented due to limited engineering resources (e.g., physician offices), masking the patient, placing the patient in a private room (e.g., office examination room) with the door closed, and providing N95 or higher level respirators or masks if respirators are not available for healthcare personnel will reduce the likelihood of airborne transmission until the patient is either transferred to a facility with an AIIR or returned to the home environment, as deemed medically appropriate. Healthcare personnel caring for patients on Airborne Precautions wear a mask or respirator, depending on the disease-specific recommendations (Respiratory Protection II.E.4, Table 2, and Appendix A), that is donned prior to room entry. Whenever possible, non-immune HCWs should not care for patients with vaccine-preventable airborne diseases (e.g., measles, chickenpox, and smallpox).

    https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/isolation/precautions.html
     
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  4. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll It's Coffee O'clock everywhere. Contributor

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    "I don't know man, Jerry doesn't look like he's gonna make it."
    "Yeah, poor guy is dying of the super Flu-cold-ultra sniffles."
    (Hacking, weezing, and snurffles from Jerry)
    "I guess since there is no cure for that, we gotta use the other
    med-kit."
    "Afraid so, but at least it will be quick."
    "Just close your eyes there Jimmy, everything is gonna be alright."
    (Cylinder check on the .44 mag, and the hammer is cocked).
    "One cure coming up,"
    (The gun fires, and Jerry's head is a mess of brain and bone soup.)
    "Damn it man, this ain't getting any easier. We can't keep on curing
    the sick like this."
    "Shh, it's alright man, they ain't suffering no more."

    (Helicopter loudspeaker offering assistance to the infected.)

    "Son of a gun, we should waited 5 minutes before popping Jerry.
    Woulda saved us one of our precious lead pills."
    :p
     
  5. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Not exactly. Heavy droplets fall to the ground beyond 3 feet(ish) (they go a bit further with violent coughing). But the organisms are still viable and spread from the surfaces they fall on to hands to eye, nose, mouth infecting the next person.

    When the CDC is referring to: "these pathogens do not remain infectious over long distances in a healthcare facility" they mean not infectious in the air. They are saying the organisms are not going to travel down the hall in the air.

    Don't conflate 'precautions' with the particular pathogen's route of transmission because there are often more than one routes of transmission.

    For example, MRSA is droplet spread if it is in one's pharynx or lungs, but it is not droplet spread from a skin infection. A wound or skin infection from MRSA would require contact precautions.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2018
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  6. John Calligan

    John Calligan Contributor Contributor

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    Thanks for clarifying.

    When I was a paramedic, I just treated everything in the world like it was lava. lol No one used more disinfectant than me.
     
  7. Zombie Among Us

    Zombie Among Us Active Member

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    Sorry y'all, a lot came up and I completely forgot to reply to this. Thanks for all your responses! I'll do some research on MRSA.
     
  8. EBohio

    EBohio Banned

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    Yep, MRSA, or "Flesh Eating Bacterium" is the first thing that popped into my head.
     
  9. camphore

    camphore Member

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    I had MRSA a few years back in my index finger. Most painful thing I think ever. If I remember correctly, it is not overly contagious but that is something your evil scientists will need to deal with.

    Does it have to be a bacteria? Ebola is still pretty scary without any mutations.
     
  10. flawed personality

    flawed personality Contributor Contributor

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    How do you manage to be so twisted, morbidly funny and yet still lovable? :p
     
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