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Comma placement

  1. Answer 1

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  2. Answer 2

    6 vote(s)
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  1. ThenColmSaid

    ThenColmSaid New Member

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    Comma placement

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by ThenColmSaid, Sep 22, 2016.

    I was just wondering about the formation of a sentence. The comma can be a bit tricky with me sometimes, so I was just wondering if some of you grammar gods could tell me if a comma is needed for this sentence:

    You would be free of death, and I, of this crippling memory.

    or is it:

    You would be free of death, and I of this crippling memory.
     
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  2. Scot

    Scot Contributing Member

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    Or
    You would be free, of death, and I of this crippling memory.

    Just a different emphasis.

    Edit: I voted for option 2
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2016
  3. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I like option number two just because it sounds less archaic.

    But I'm not a comma authority.

    :)
     
  4. Dr. Mambo

    Dr. Mambo Contributing Member

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    There's no grammatical basis for the second comma in number one that I'm aware of. "And I" isn't an aside, nor is it an independent clause. Two is correct.
     
  5. thirdwind

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    Grammatically speaking, there's no comma needed at all. In the case, the second clause isn't an independent clause. However, given the option, I would pick the second one. It's OK to break the rules in creative writing, but make sure you understand why you're doing it and what effect it has.
     
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  6. deadrats

    deadrats Contributing Member

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    I also was going to say there is no comma needed in that sentence.
     
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  7. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    A third for no comma.

    But if you really want to force a pause for stylistic reasons, definitely the second, for the reason @Spencer1990 gives.

    And now I'm questioning the commas in my own reply :meh:
     
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  8. Viridian

    Viridian Contributing Member Supporter

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    Option 2, and I would put a comma there. But then I have a problem with using too many commas:confused:
     
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  9. cydney

    cydney Banned

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    This is a really good question. You picked the perfect sentence. And is a conjunction so technically you don't need one before or after it. I think I might put one after I. But you don't really need it. HOWEVER, I think the sentence is more attractive or inviting to the eye with a comma. So, my vote is no-tellin' - it's up to you.

    In the final analysis I think I'd do it this way:

     
  10. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    I used to as well, but I've gone the other way - probably too much so that I leave them out when they should be there.
     
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  11. Francis de Aguilar

    Francis de Aguilar Contributing Member

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    Isn't option two what is called the Oxford comma?
     
  12. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    An Oxford comma is the last in a list.

    I want tea, milk, (oxford comma) and biscuits.

    As opposed to...

    I want tea, milk and biscuits.
     
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  13. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    Nope - that's the comma that separates the last two items in the list.

    No Oxford comma: I ate bananas, peaches and pears.

    Oxford comma: I ate bananas, peaches, and pears.

    DAMN YOU, SPENCER1990. And me, because now I want fruit salad and tea.
     
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  14. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    What I want to know is why biscuits and tea came to mind first. I'm American and hardly drink hot tea. :confused:
     
  15. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    Don't you guys call them cookies anyway, and biscuits are some kind of savoury thing you eat with gravy?
     
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  16. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    Neither do us Brits. Don't let stereotyping sway you.

    Well, they may drink tea down south, but they're foreigners anyway so they don't count.
     
  17. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    So you can see why I'm confused.

    To be fair, I didn't say Brits did drink a lot of hot tea, haha. o_O

    Genuine question: Is hot tea no more common in the UK than it is in the US? Is that really just a huge stereotype?
     
  18. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    Not huge. They do drink tea down there, but America seems to think the whole of England drinks nothing else. It's as big a stereotype as the bowler hats and briefcase get-up.

    Then again, America seems to think London IS the whole of England.
     
  19. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    @Spencer1990 Depends on the household/individual in my experience. My two colleagues at work drink tea non-stop--literally, like the way some people chain smoke--but I can easily go months without a cup.

    Dunno what it's like up north. I don't go beyond Watford on principle.
     
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  20. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I was never so disillusioned to think of England as only London. I'd like to think I'm better than that. I suppose I just thought it was a culture thing. Like varying degrees depending on where you go, but present nonetheless.
     
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  21. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    That's only cos you'd get battered when you opened your mouth and we heard the weird way you speak.
     
  22. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributing Member Contributor

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    *slips out the back door casually, careful not to speak in my weird American accent*
     
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  23. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    No, we like Americans. They're a novelty. Southerners, however...
     
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  24. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    Northerners wouldn't understand you--they don't get electricity until 2019, so aren't used to US accents on TV.
     
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  25. Francis de Aguilar

    Francis de Aguilar Contributing Member

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    When is it correct to put a comma before 'and' in other circumstances?
     

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