1. Medazza

    Medazza Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    208

    Dead space ship and ice....

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Medazza, Nov 3, 2016.

    ok I have a space ship that was built using an asteroid so part of its bulk is the original rock but with a nose and engines etc sticking out of it.

    It's dead, reasons don't matter but it's been floating out near Neptune. Would it freeze? Would that create ice either on the rock areas or the metal?

    Any help gratefully received!
     
  2. EnginEsq

    EnginEsq Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2016
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    123
    Pretty sure it would be at a temperature below the freezing point of water.
    But no ice crystals on the outside.
    1. you need water to form ice crystals - where would it come from?
    2. ice sublimates in a vacuum. Without a gravitational field at least equivalent in strength to a moon, it's going to sublimate off into space, never to return.
    Now, inside the space ship, if there are sealed (or relatively sealed) areas, there can be ice.
     
    SardonicWriter likes this.
  3. SardonicWriter

    SardonicWriter Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    21
    So like, Knights of Sidonia type of spaceship? Cool. ​
     
  4. Medazza

    Medazza Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    208
    Brilliant, that all makes sense. Thank you so much
     
  5. Medazza

    Medazza Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    208
    I'd never heard of that but looked it up on wiki, sounds interesting
     
  6. newjerseyrunner

    newjerseyrunner Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2016
    Messages:
    1,286
    Likes Received:
    1,233
    Wait! Neptune? I've will not sublimate that far out, in astrophysics there is an term for the line in space around a star where ice can form: the frost line.

    Inside of that line, ice sublimates because the energy from the sun provides enough energy to overcome the electromagnetic attraction water molecules have to each other.

    Beyond that line though, the temperature is low enough that the electromagnetic attraction between water molecules actually overcomes the heat energy between them. Remember that matter does wonky things in extreme energies. Out by Neptune you'd probably be somewhere around 50 kelvin.

    That line is just inside of Jupiter.
     
  7. JackyJack

    JackyJack Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2016
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    14
    Sometimes my jaw drops down, looking at the lengths authors consider to be necessary for their work. I understand it from “make your setting shine” perspective, but find it hard to assume, that majority of readers will have grasp over astrophysics. “Stars Wars” with its Death Star is an interesting concept, yet a complete failure from logic’s standpoint. Do you have a specific auditory?
     
  8. Dnaiel

    Dnaiel Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2016
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    324
    When I see reviews praising a scifi novel for getting the science right, I'm more likely to buy it even though I know I'll have zero idea what the science is about. As long as the author can make the actual science interesting to read, it's worth my wallet.
     
    newjerseyrunner likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice