1. frigocc

    frigocc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    159

    "Dueling Narrators?"

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by frigocc, Mar 15, 2019.

    So I've gone back and forth with my writing between first-person and third-person omniscient. I love how in character I can get with first-person, truly having my novel read as if my main character wrote it, but I also love third-person omniscient, where I imagine someone like Jim Broadbent narrating.

    Has anyone mixed the two? Where the majority of the time, you're in third-person omniscient, but, occasionally, the main character will chime in (probably denoted by italics), and correct the narrator, or tell that part in his own way.
     
  2. Reece

    Reece Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2019
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    341
    I think it could work, particularly for your story. The narrator could be pointing out all the ways the MC is fucking up while the MC is convinced he is being awesome. I picture the narrator more like morgan freeman.
     
  3. Elven Candy

    Elven Candy Pay no attention to the foot in my mouth Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Messages:
    751
    Likes Received:
    471
    I've never written or read a book with dueling narrators, but that sounds like a very interesting experiment! If done well, I imagine it could be a refreshing and interesting read. I'd say go with it.
     
  4. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    12,700
    Likes Received:
    7,075
    Location:
    California, US
    Sure, it can work. I've read books switching between first person and third person narrators (more than just two), and at least one that even threw a second person narrator into the mix. Give it a try and see how you like the end result.
     
  5. frigocc

    frigocc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    159
    I just have to figure out how often I want to have a first person interjection.

    The only example I might think of is the Stranger Than Fiction movie. I believe it does this, but haven't seen it in years.
     
  6. Elven Candy

    Elven Candy Pay no attention to the foot in my mouth Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Messages:
    751
    Likes Received:
    471
    I imagine that's a difficult balance to achieve. Good luck to you! Who knows, maybe you'll start a new way of writing books ;).
     
  7. halisme

    halisme Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,743
    Likes Received:
    1,160

    While not a written example, here you go.
     
    Stormsong07, jannert and frigocc like this.
  8. frigocc

    frigocc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    159
    Lol, funniest scene I've seen in a while.
     
  9. frigocc

    frigocc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    159
    Though, even though that was INCREDIBLY entertaining, I'd want it a lot less. Just an occasional interjection here and there. And only with the main character. But again, loved that.
     
  10. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    11,919
    Likes Received:
    13,258
    Location:
    Scotland
    That is hilarious.

    And maybe an answer to the OP's question! :)
     
  11. NobodySpecial

    NobodySpecial Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    A great example would be The Girl on the Train. Three unreliable narrators.
     
  12. Flummi

    Flummi New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Germany
    That sounds good. I know of narrations using both the first person and the third perspective, this allows to show things to the reader that the protagonist doesn't see/know - as he/she has a narrowed perspective. The reader wants to point out "look, look here!", that's another way to bring tension into the storyline.
     

Share This Page