1. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    Expanding a story- How do you decide where to add?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Matthew Fibbons, Aug 21, 2017.

    I know all the details of the story well, but I am having trouble laying out the timeline to find the best fit for the new material. It can be added in more than one place, so I am asking for advice on laying out the timeline to see it at a glance. Have any of you found a good application to do this?
     
  2. surrealscenes

    surrealscenes Senior Member

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    No.

    Think about what is being added, how it changes the MC, where/when that change should take place, etc. Substitute a different word for 'change' if it fits better. In a story, most everything should be driving both the main story, and the MC, forward. Thinking in those terms may help (if you haven't already). If you analyze what you want to add, it will probably become apparent that there is only one logical place for it, but there may be more places it could go.
    Stay away from the 'coulds', and stick to the 'shoulds' is my advice.
     
  3. Wreybies

    Wreybies Thrice Retired Supporter Contributor

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    And to expand on this - since the OP says he/she feels that it can go in more than one place - even if the new material doesn't directly affect change in the MC, does it affect how the reader engages the MC? Does it provide information that may cause us to look differently upon the MC or other characters and alter later engagement thereof? The exact same glass of orange juice tastes quite different before vs. right after you brush your teeth.
     
  4. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    Thank you for your insight and time taken to help!
     
  5. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    Very true, about the orange juice. I get what you are saying. I am thinking that all the ways the new material could affect the MC is part of my problem. (Probably nothing new to an experienced writer though)
     
  6. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    And I thank you also Wreybies!
     
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  7. Seven Crowns

    Seven Crowns Contributor Contributor

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    If you're trying to make a story bigger without padding it out, you're adding a subplot. Is that what you're planning? (I'm guessing, yes.)

    The perfect subplot starts early and finishes late, but it's going to send ripples through the pond, so you'll have to revise everything to accompany it. I suppose I would break the subplot up into intro, rising conflict, disaster, climax, denouement, and fit those five scenes in. Then I would add details in the in-between scenes to make sure it meshes.
     
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  8. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    Thanks Seven Crowns. I see the "ripples through the pond" you speak of. I guess ultimately I have to decide on how much I want to allow the sub plot to change the whole work. Thanks again!
     
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  9. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    By the way, you nailed it. I don't want padding.
     
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  10. Walking Dog

    Walking Dog Active Member

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    I've grown fond of Scrivener. It has some tools that help keep the story straight and to see at a glance how it flows.

    Do you keep an outline, or do you work straight from your head?
     
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  11. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    A little bit of both. I started like most amateurs... Just get it on paper and go from there. I keep files on the characters and I have all of the edits, but until Seven Crowns confirmed there was no way around the work, I didn't create an outline until yesterday. (Fairly easy, but a little too late for the clarity I need at this point)
     
  12. Matthew Fibbons

    Matthew Fibbons Member

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    I have never heard of "Scrivener" either by the way. THANKS FOR YOUR INPUT WALKING DOG!
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2017

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