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  1. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    Faerie Enthusiasts? Recommendations & Discussions

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by NoGoodNobu, Oct 21, 2016.

    I really like faerie stories, and I'm sure it's only a niche fanbase, but〜

    Does anyone have any worksーof antiquity or modernityーthat features (or preferably relies on) fae that they recommend or love?

    I've been reading so far such works as Gawain & the Green Knight, Sir Orfeo, The Wooing of Etain, The Ballad of Tam Lin, Thomas the Rhymer, Stardust, Fire & Hemlock, Tithe, Valiant, and The Darkest Part of the Forest (may have forgotten a few).

    I'm not quite so fond of Wicked Lovely, but--when there isn't more palatable plates--I'll taste whatever's laid before me.

    Also, if there are any faerie enthusiasts that would like to discuss any of the stories, that would also be fun.

    I know this sort of thing isn't quite so popular as vampires or wizards or zombies or whathaveyou, but I'm sure at least one other person must have a little interest?
     
  2. Iain Sparrow

    Iain Sparrow Banned Contributor

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    Young lady, you need to live a little more dangerously.

    But if fairytales are your thing, then at least read a good one... 'The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making', by Catherynne Valente.
    It's very innovative, in an odd sort of way, and truly well written.

    If you want something more imaginative and modern, try 'Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War', by Clive Barker. I hate Clive Barker's horror crap, but his foray into YA fiction is really well done.
     
  3. Lea`Brooks

    Lea`Brooks Contributor Contributor

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    Have you tried Wings? It's a four book YA urban fantasy series, and the author's take on faeries is completely different than anything I've ever seen before. I really enjoyed them.

    The first book moves a little quickly. It was great the first time I read it, but now that I'm an adult, it's a little jarring. The MC meets new friends and becomes BFFs with them after like... two pages. But push past that if you can. It gets a lot better. The last book gets a little darker. I probably liked it the least because it lost a little of that positive faerie energy that drew me in in the first place.

    But overall, it's still a very successful series.
     
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  4. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    Why do I need to live more dangerously? I'm personally rather fond of my lifestyle at the moment. A little physically exhausting, but quite pleasant most days. I do have my daily allotment of bruises, but I like that my bone breaking occurs quite infrequently. Any more dangerously sounds rather too perilous for my liking

    If you are metaphorically speaking about my reading, I'm also fairly happy there. For one, stories of faerie are not the sole genre or subject of works I read--I just have an immediate desire to read more.

    Also, by stories of faerie (I tried very hard by spelling & word choice to illustrate this) I do not mean fairytales. I mean tales with gancanagth & kelpies & red caps & brownies, with trooping fae & solitary fae, with the Wild Hunt & forbidden faerie food, with the strict mores & ambiguous morals.

    I do like fairytales & folktales and love works of most sorts of fantasy.

    I would say out of the listed works I've been reading, Holly Black is the one modern author who comes closest to incorporeating most of these traits (and in truth, I think she did collect & then combine common faerie incidents that of old were more often one-a-story).

    Granted, The Wooing of Etain was pretty eventful; it was my first time reading that story, and it felt like the Nevi'im (Old Testament narratives) & Greek mythology had a Celtic love-child. It was delightful. I probably ought to've read all the tales of the Tuatha De Danann already, but to be honest I haven't even finished the Poetic Edda or the Nibelungenlied, so I'm probably behind on a lot of old stories.

    Anyway, it just seems hard to come across stories of faerie which is why I was hoping people might be able to share titles with me to check out.

    Thank you for your recommendations. I hadn't heard of either, so I will give them a go.

    (⌒▽⌒)
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2016
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  5. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    Thank you for the recommendation: I will definitely check it out

    Edit: And I know what you mean--Holly Black's faerie books tend to get very dark very quickly. It's probably why I prefer her The Darkest Part of the Forest to Tithe, Valiant, and Ironside; it isn't quite so bleak as her others, although it has dalliances with the tone.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2016
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  6. Domino355

    Domino355 Senior Member

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    While not entirely about Faeries, in The Dresden Files series they play a major part in the story from book 4 onwards.
     
  7. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    I actually just started The Dresden Files yesterday

    While of course Storm Front has only had Toot and a brief mention of the "Unseelie Incursion" (thus far), the story does fit my other need for various and varied supernatural entities. I like wizards and vampyrs and aswangs and tengu and basically general or regional creatures of myth & magic〜
     
  8. izzybot

    izzybot Transhuman Autophage Contributor

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    Have you read Emma Bull's War for the Oaks? It's been ages since I read it so it miiight not hold up, but I remember loving it when I read it originally. I also remember enjoying some of Charles de Lint's stuff, though The Blue Girl is the only thing that comes to mind. Since you mention Holly Black you've probably read The Spiderwick Chronicles, eh - they're definitely for kids but I have the boxset and I still love the illustrations. Oh, and you could watch Lost Girl (for the laughs, mostly).

    Also, Tam Lin < 3 Easily my favorite folk tale. I used to be able to recite parts of the ballad but I guess it got pushed out for memorizing some other trivia.
     
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  9. Selbbin

    Selbbin I hate you Contributor

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    Undine? She's kind of a faerie.
     
  10. Steerpike

    Steerpike Felis amatus Contributor

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    Raymond Feist - Faerie Tale
    Emma Bull - the War for the Oaks
    Charles de Lint's Newford books
    Wen Spencer - Tinker
     
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  11. Ebenezer Lux

    Ebenezer Lux Member

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    Being a fantasy writer, the faerie archetype is one I've curiously avoided, so I second the request for recommendations. Thank you! Great thread!
     
  12. Ghost Reflection

    Ghost Reflection Active Member

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    The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser? I started reading, but have not finished. It's a tough read, but an interesting. It was written in the 16th century, so that it partly why it is difficult, at least for me. I was told it was violent, but I haven't even come close to anything in there that compares to Game of Thrones types stuff, though that my just mean I haven't gotten to it yet. I really should finish it some day. I'm pretty fond of medieval literature and folk lore, but it can really be a workout for the brain so I don't read it as much.

    I have dabbled to the fae in some of my writings, but haven't gotten too far in it, though I'm not ready to just chuck it completely.
     
  13. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    I love the Faerie Queene

    If you get accostomed to the diction & rhythm, it's actually a really simple read—anyone who's read & comprehendeded Shakespeare should have no trouble getting into the flow & cadences after a stanza or few. Spenser is nowhere near as complex or layered as Shakespeare.

    I finished Book 1 a month ago with Redcrosse and Una, but there isn't really any intense battles till 3/4 of the way in, and possibly just the ending. I don't think it's anything Game of Thrones worthy, but I've never read GoT (or watched it). Can't rightly recall if it gets more intense in the latter books~
     
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  14. NoGoodNobu

    NoGoodNobu Contributor Contributor

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    Oh, I completely forgot Christina Rossetti's "Goblin Market" which is actually one of my favourites

    It's just a poem, but it's so vivid & incredible

    And there is nothing quite so perfect as listening to Natascha McElhone, who plays with the sultry undertones in her reading

    I can't believe I forgot Goblin Market
     
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