1. BayView

    BayView Contributor Contributor

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    Fandom

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by BayView, Jul 13, 2018 at 12:09 AM.

    I just read an article about Dune (books, movie, general property) that suggested it holds a unique place in fandom for a variety of reasons, but largely because it's too vast to be limited, but also too obscure to be commercialized. (article at https://theoutline.com/post/5333/dune-revival-2018-david-lynch)

    And it got me thinking about fandom in general. Not just being a fan of something, but that desire to reach out to other fans, share your interest, and do something with it, whether it's fanfic or vids or essays or cosplay or art or edits or gifs or just general sleuthing and organizing....

    It's something that's really important to a lot of people. Are any of you guys part of any fandoms? What do you do? Why do you do it? Do you think your participation in fandom has enhanced your appreciation of the source material, or is fandom something separate for you?
     
  2. Mink

    Mink Senior Member

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    You have no idea.

    Okay, you might. Then we can be nerd-buddies. :p

    I'm a part of several fandoms that include "Assassin's Creed", "Batman", "Yuri on Ice", "Loveless", and "Gotham". If yaoi counts, I'm also a member of that club. I write fanfiction (right now it's primarily "Yuri on Ice" and "Loveless") and I cosplay along with attend comic conventions. I've cosplayed as a Renaissance version of female Loki, Harley Quinn (both versions), Winter Soldier, and Sha Gojyo from "Saiyuki". I'm intending on making a Joker outfit along with an Ezio outfit (possibly even an Arno one). I also want to make a Mink outfit (from "DRAMAtical Murder").

    I like to participate in these fandom and groups because they understand my stupid and crazy obsession with certain characters, shows, and books. They get why I lost my mind because Newt Scamander had a Hufflepuff scarf on or why I giggled like little schoolgirl when watching "Assassin's Creed"; they totally get why I lost my mind during a certain part of a certain episode in the last season of "Gotham". I enjoy dressing up because not only do I get to present as my gender if I want to, but it also lets me just play around. It's really just a fun thing to do. I think my participation in fandoms hasn't really enhanced my appreciation because I already love the material. Fandoms are just places where I can nerd out and meet like-minded people.
     
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  3. BayView

    BayView Contributor Contributor

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    I think I've come at it from the opposite direction. I've been independently obsessed with things in the days before the internet, but the only real fandom I've been part of was for Supernatural, and it was by accident. (I was playing around online one day, stumbled over a really interesting story that turned out to be novel-length, devoured it, and only then, when I looked for more by the same author, did I realize it was fanfic for a show I'd never watched. I read more of that author's fic, branched out to some other authors in the same fandom, and finally started watching the TV show to see what the fuss was about. Then eventually I wrote some fanfic of my own, but it was often inspired more by other people's fic rather than the show itself.)

    Do you think there are some original works that lend themselves to fandom more than others. I mean, there's often a SFF element to Cosplay, I think? It's more fun to dress up as a fantastic space creature than a contemporary teenager. But are there other elements that lend themselves to feeding fandom? (Not in a fanservice way, necessarily...)

    And do you see the corporate element to it? One of the ideas from the Dune article I linked to was that being a fan sometimes feels like you're "doing an unpaid PR internship for Disney or AT&T Time Warner." I never really felt that way in Supernatural, but I was there near the start of the show (I think maybe around the third season only?) before they seemed to really catch on to fandom culture...
     
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  4. Zerotonin

    Zerotonin Serotonin machine broke Contest Administrator Supporter

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    I'm quite a big fan of a few things: Supernatural, Dragon Age, and The Flash (both character and show), to name my favorites. However, I don't believe I'm really a "traditional fan," as I tend to focus my excitement and passion for these fandoms inwardly. I fantasize about what it would be like to live in Thedas (the world of Dragon Age), or how I would use the powers of the Flash. I consider what life would be like if I knew monsters existed, and whether or not I'd have the strength and resolve to hunt them.

    I do understand that there's a certain level of commerciality in any fandom. The producer of said product will often use their fans for free advertisement by encouraging them to talk about the show in a variety of mediums. Hell, I remember a few years ago there was a huge upsurge of shows encouraging their fans to "live tweet" their reactions during the show's air time.
     
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  5. BayView

    BayView Contributor Contributor

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    Video game fandoms are intriguing to me because games are already so interactive! But I can definitely see the appeal of dreaming your way out of the boundaries of the game.
     
  6. Zerotonin

    Zerotonin Serotonin machine broke Contest Administrator Supporter

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    The thing that draws me in about Dragon Age specifically is that it has a lot of lore that you can dig into, but they don't necessarily shove it down your throat. I'm a sucker for lore-rich games, being a storyteller myself.
     
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  7. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I've been writing GoT fanfic lately. Sadly, the kid of fanfic I write means that both original fiction folk and fanfiction folk are rather uninterested in my stories. There are only two canon characters in the story I am working on at the moment, Brienne of Tarth and Podrick Payne. Everyone else is, by necessity, an OC. The story also takes place first on Tarth and then in the Summer Isles, both places that in the books and the shows are only given passing mention, so ffic aficionados don't seem drawn to these stories in any notable number. I've written a few other ffics in other fandoms that lean much more heavily into their source material (Legend of Korra, LotR, The Expanse, Altered Carbon) that have been well-received, but this latest story, not so much... o_O

    Regardless, and to answer the original question, what attracts me to writing these GoT stories is that I'm always intrigued by side characters, especially when I like them better than central characters. I think a love of Larry Niven's Known Space stories as a kid has something to do with it. Those books are less a series of books and more a web of interconnected stories, so you can start with almost any of the books, doesn't really matter. If someone or some event gets a mention in one book, you can bet your bippy that there's another book that zooms in on that person or event and expands it into a complete novel, so no ancillary character or event remains ancillary for long within the greater web of Known Space books.
     
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  8. Mink

    Mink Senior Member

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    @BayView

    I think fandoms, at least the major ones, have a lot to do with timing along with "shock" factor in what they deal with. For example, GoT has a massive following and I think a lot of it had to do that it's an adult fantasy that deals with a lot of "shocking" things like sex, rape, and incest. It also has dragons and a lot of people like dragons. "Supernatural" involves, or involved, fairly complex story lines that dealt with a variety of factors of life. Both deal with things that weren't really in focus at the time they came out.

    Of course it's fun to cosplay fantastical creatures, but some fandoms don't have that. Many of the larger yaoi works like "DRAMAtical Murder", "Junjo Romantica", and "Gravitation" all have human characters and people routinely cosplay as them. "Yuri on Ice" is the same way. I'm nearly dying to do a Viktor cosplay.

    I see how it can be seen as PR and corporate based, but it doesn't bother me and I don't think it bothers most. I like my fandoms and my nerdiness, and I want to share that when I can.

    Plus, like you said, dressing up as something fantastical is fun.
     
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  9. Laurin Kelly

    Laurin Kelly Contributor Contributor

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    I used to be very, very active in the Glee fandom, to the point that I made two separate trips to Los Angeles to meet up with my online friends at charity events for our favorite actor. It actually started my writing journey, as the first 32 stories I ever wrote were fanfic for that fandom (a couple were novel/novella length). Unfortunately the fandom was a toxic dumpster fire and the show went to absolute crap, so between the two I'm pretty soured on participating in fandom going forward.

    I do still have quite a few friends from those days that I keep in touch with, though we've all moved on from our original mutual interest. And I dedicated my first book to my fandom first readers!

    Capture.JPG
     
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