1. nastyjman

    nastyjman Senior Member

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    Fiction writing modes

    Discussion in 'By the Genre' started by nastyjman, Jun 21, 2017.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiction-writing_mode

    Hey folks, I just wanted to bring a discussion regarding fiction writing mode. If you need to acquaint yourself with it, you can click the link above.

    Anyway, the thing I want to discuss is how you use these modes or if you even use them at all. I know that I've been using them unconsciously and naturally even before coming across this concept. Now that I'm aware of it, I've been noticing the sentences I write and the flow of each sentences from one mode to another.

    I think it's improving my word count too. If I'm stalled at what the next sentence is, I just go through the possible or logical mode that follows. For example, if I just described an object, I could have a character do some introspection on it or have the character throw the object across the room.

    Things like that...

    It also added to my fiction study and analyses. When I do copywork, I'm now highlighting sentences with colors that pertain to their modes. For example, interiority is blue (because the mind is as vast as the ocean), description green, action red and dialogue none because it's easily distinguishable (unless you're McCarthy).

    That's it for my thoughts regarding that. Would like to hear yours as well and hope that this post made you learn something new.

    Cheers and keep writing!
     
  2. Ulquiorra9000

    Ulquiorra9000 Member

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    I've only sometimes felt the need to consciously consider which mode is needed for a scene or line. Not very often, really. I go by instinct and it always seems right. I make heavy use of introspection and showing, as well as in media res to create intense, compact, vivid prose. For me, that's what brings the scene to life. In fact, I'm usually reluctant to put any exposition outside of character actions or dialogue or introspection, because it feels so heavy and slow. The same goes for describing people; a few critical details are all that's needed, and I put them into other sentences to do double duty. Such as a narrator not liking a suit someone else wears, or being impressed by someone's military uniform and being inspired by it. I want efficiency in what I do, and my sentences and paragraphs often do double or triple duty.
     
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  3. nastyjman

    nastyjman Senior Member

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    Yep. The modes come naturally, but being aware of it just helped me with my writing pace.

    It's really interesting. Being aware of it reminded me of the Centipede's Dilemma--

    You become aware of something that was an unconscious habit, and then you begin stumbling around and become clumsy. But, as you practice more, you master or improve on what was once an unconscious habit.
     
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  4. OJB

    OJB A Mean Old Man Contributor

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    Hello Nasty,

    I've actually used this in my own writing a lot.

    I tend to rotate them is a certain order, however.

    1.External events. (Anything my MC does not do)
    2. Sensation/Emotions/Internal thought.
    3. Action
    4. Dialogue.

    Some people might call it Mechanical, but when people read some of my stuff they wonder how I come up with what I write; it is really just me following my own self-imposed Mechanics.
     
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  5. nastyjman

    nastyjman Senior Member

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    Interesting. It's the stimulus--internalization--reaction chain that I've read about.
     
  6. Miscellaneous Worker

    Miscellaneous Worker Member

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    Where there is work...
    I've never thought about how people use the writing mode mechanic in writing, and I don't use it often myself. After learning it and looking at stories though, I see how a lot of people have a pattern in their writing with how they transition from one mode to the other, and it's pretty interesting '-'

    When I write, it comes naturally but other times I think of the current mode and it reminds me to not stay on one for too long, for example writing too much dialogue and not describing anything else that is happening during that. I like that you made a thread for it because I don't see the subject all that often.
     
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  7. nastyjman

    nastyjman Senior Member

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    I'm happy that you've learned something!
     

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