1. Terrie000

    Terrie000 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2016
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Minnesota

    Finally you find or You finally find?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Terrie000, Jan 25, 2017.

    I'm working on a public speech, which is grammatically correct? Finally find sounds harder to say in a speech to me... lol.

    You keep on diving, pass the tallest mountains, and (finally you find/you finally find) an individual worth looking for - you think it is going to be your ultimate love, but unfortunately, it turns out to be me (surprise!).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,513
    Likes Received:
    3,380
    Replace "find" with "discover" or a different synonym for "find." And the alliteration won't be a problem.

    As for the order, it depends on whether or not you want a pause.

    "Finally, you find"

    "You finally find"

    ETA: I don't believe there is anything grammatically incorrect about either of your examples.
     
  3. big soft moose

    big soft moose An Admoostrator Staff Supporter Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Messages:
    18,174
    Likes Received:
    21,159
    Location:
    East devon/somerset border
    I'd just say 'at last you find' and avoid the issue ... also do you keep driving rather than diving ?
     
  4. Terrie000

    Terrie000 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2016
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Minnesota
    @big soft moose - Diving. Here's the whole paragraph:

    If you will, let us activate our imaginations. You are descending from the sky, swaying through the blurry fog, the elusive clouds, and gaze upon this magnificent world to search for an interesting person. You see a few people at the peak, but you pass right through them because these perfectionists have no relevancy to your life. You keep on diving, pass the tallest mountains, and finally you find an individual worth looking for - you think it is going to be your ultimate love, but unfortunately, it turns out to be me (surprise!).

    I'm planning to use this speech for my Toastmaster International Contest. I'm kind of incorporating second point of view into this speech to draw my audiences and ask them to travel with me through their astral spirit form.

    Thanks both!
     
  5. matwoolf

    matwoolf Banned Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Messages:
    6,807
    Likes Received:
    10,127
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    LADIES & GENTLEMEN...activate imagination.

    Descend from the sky, sway through blurry fog,

    sniff clouds, gaze upon this magnificent world,

    search for a person to love.

    Some wave at the peaks, [wave back]

    but you

    float beyond

    down into the valley.

    Those mountains sure were pretty. [pause, hands on hips..tch]

    finally, finally, finally you find an individual worth looking for, finally, your ultimate love,

    turns out to be me (surprise! audience member rushes stage, twirl, put her down/him x).
     
    NiallRoach likes this.
  6. Sack-a-Doo!

    Sack-a-Doo! Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    1,644
    Location:
    [unspecified]
    I'd go with @big soft moose's solution.

    But, to answer the question...

    "Finally find" is an example of the CKB (Classic Kirk Blunder), "boldly go." It's bad grammar and I have to wonder if so many of these discussions would crop up if not for the Star Trek opening credits and that badly-worded voice-over.

    A rule of thumb I came across concerning the use of adverbs suggests that they be placed either as the first word in a sentence or the last.

    You would then end up with: Finally, you will find...

    OR

    You will find <it>, finally.
     
  7. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,428
    Likes Received:
    1,991
    Otherwise known as the split infinitive.

    In "Yes, Minister" there's a reference to a civil servant who would "rather split his trousers than an infinitive".
     
    matwoolf and Sack-a-Doo! like this.
  8. NiallRoach

    NiallRoach Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    694
    Likes Received:
    575
    Location:
    The middle of the UK
    This is not an infinitive! It's clearly modified by 'you', and has nothing to do with Kirk and his going boldly.

    I'll tell you, OP, what I tell my students when dealing with adverbs: you can stick them in front of you want to, but only when you've got a good reason to, like it being poetry or a speech.

    Both are fine. Look up some presidential speeches and you'll find the same inverted adverb structures all over the shop.
     
    matwoolf and BayView like this.
  9. BayView

    BayView Huh. Interesting. Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    10,854
    Likes Received:
    11,676
    Yeah, that's not an infinitive. And even if it were, the rule against split infinitives is one that's often ignored, or completely denied.

    Either version is fine - if it's for a speech, go with the one that feels best when you say it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2017

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice