1. Starryblu

    Starryblu Member

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    geographical sound

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Starryblu, Nov 9, 2016.

    How would the word "sound" be used? As in the sound between an island and the mainland? Would it be the sound side of an island, or just a sound? The main characters in my story are crossing a bridge, are they crossing a "sound" or "crossing to the sound side of the island"? Or is it a matter of how I want the story to flow?
     
  2. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

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    That's a pretty rare word @Starryblu. I had to educate myself. Not sure I'd be in a minority in not knowing what it is either, so it could be a sticking point in your story (without some hand-holding context). Could you get away with 'strait' or 'channel' ?
     
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  3. Starryblu

    Starryblu Member

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    I tried researching, and both of your suggestions came up for me. I guess I've seen references to "sound side" when I've looked at real estate as far as rentals on the islands here in North Carolina. I always look for ocean front, but lots of people stay "sound side". That's how I was originally writing, but then I got to thinking it might be wrong, and should simply be "sound." Now I'm confused lol.

    What I've been writing has been very similar to my own experiences, so a person would cross an island from sound side to ocean side, but I was unsure if I was writing correctly, or if we have been simply crossing a sound when a person goes from a mainland to an island. Maybe I'm being too nit picky.
     
  4. Quanta

    Quanta Senior Member

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    I looked at a map of Vancouver Island and all the sounds seem to be on the ocean side, thought there are also sounds on the mainland, which are, of course, ocean side even though the island stands in between. As for "crossing to the sound side of an island", wouldn't that be done on land?
     
  5. BayView

    BayView Huh. Interesting. Contributor

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    The sound is water, real estate is land - so the "sound side" would be referring to which side of the land the property is on, I assume - the sound side vs. the sea side.

    If your characters are going over water, they'd be going over the sound. But I agree with others - without a proper noun to help orient me, I'd probably be confused (even though I live in an area where several towns are named after the sound they're on (Parry Sound, Owen Sound, etc.). So if you wrote "they crossed over Puget Sound" I'd understand, but if you hadn't mentioned Puget Sound recently and started talking about "they crossed over the sound" I'd probably be confused.
     
  6. Starryblu

    Starryblu Member

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    This is all making sense. I really didn't think about how I was writing the story, as I was used to referring to "sound side" and "ocean side" because I am a vacationer on the islands. It does absolutely make sense that crossing the bridges would be crossing the actual sound that is between the two areas of land, the mainland and the island. As I am writing the story, the island is referred to in the next sentence or so, so I guess it would be made obvious what exact sound it would be that was being crossed.

    I see now, how I was making a mistake in writing the story, it makes good sense in how everyone has explained it. I do appreciate everyone's input!
     
  7. Ghost Reflection

    Ghost Reflection Active Member

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    I live in the Puget Sound area, and that's normally how it is referred to, as an area. I've never heard the use of "sound side", but that could just be a local thing or due to the physical layout. Sometimes we talk about islands being located in the in the sound or living in the Puget Sound area. But when we are having to travel across the body of water, we normally refer to the name of the bridge or ferry. It would definitely need the full name to orient the reader, and then maybe after introducing it you could get away with referring to it as just the sound. Unless you live by, or near one, or are a geologist with a particular interest, it's likely the reader would be unfamiliar.

    A sound may be obscure, but it's a very specific in definition, and very fitting when compared to other geographical categories. Or calling it something else would feel unnatural to me.
     
  8. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Why does it need a label as to which side of the island the bridge connects to? If you cross the sound on a bridge, it's only going to connect to the sound side of the island.

    Around here, (Puget Sound), it would be crossing the sound. The islands are usually named: bridge to Camano Island; or, the bridge is named: Hood Canal Bridge.
     
  9. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

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    While I'm wise to it now following this thread, I'd be comfortable seeing it in print and wouldn't be puzzled by it. But I took a straw poll today at work though and 9 out of 9 of my colleague landlubbers didn't know what it was. It just wasn't in their vernacular. Again I figure context is key if the word's going to be used for a wider audience.
     
  10. matwoolf

    matwoolf Banned Contributor

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    - One of those words you understand in context.

    Tho' I mainly struggle with mountaineering adventure -

    'crossing the high cornice, we belayed to the bivvy for a mug of melted snow and pemmican.'

    nnnr?

    'Then I severed the rope, my best friend fell 10 000 feet to his death.'

    Okay, good.

    'But he was not dead, actually.

    In fact, Roger, my buddy, he rapelled past the cwm of Green Boots, his descender held in a frozen mitten. Later, having severed his left arm with a Swiss Army Knife, it was the Sherpas who discovered that limb in a couloir aside base camp. How we waved for his returning silhouette, he did not wave back.

    Who? Wha..

    [this one might require another draft if anybody can write some mountains?]
     
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  11. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

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    I couldn't best that @matwoolf . No bleeding cracks there for me crampons. Only word that poked out was couloir, but that was workoutable enough with where it sat. Bravo. :)
     
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  12. Starryblu

    Starryblu Member

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    Wow, I'm really confused now. I know I'm nit-picking where I don't have to. As I've said before, this writing stuff? It's new to me, and I don't want to look like a fool by using words incorrectly. I already spend plenty of time playing the fool.

    *example (if you want the sad story of my life, haha) my boss is telling of how her daughter's ball team got skunked. I gave her a cure of how to get rid of the smell. Yep. I really did that. Not one of my more brilliant moments.
     
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  13. matwoolf

    matwoolf Banned Contributor

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    Oh...I heard the word in use since your original post...and it's a good word. Definitely use it - meaning fjord I'd say [95% certain] but paint a picture to make things obvious - 'the hall walls of Desolation Sound glistened in dark misery, blah blah de blah...'
     
  14. matwoolf

    matwoolf Banned Contributor

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    Yeah, that's what I said in meaning nearly.
     
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  15. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll It's Coffee O'clock everywhere. Contributor

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    I think it works just fine. Had to cross a sound on my 4th anniversary, too bad the place we went was not
    up to the hype. Kinda like my marriage. :p
     
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  16. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll It's Coffee O'clock everywhere. Contributor

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    @Carly Berg thanks for the support. Though the odds, cards, and quite possibly deities like me alone and miserable. 9 Years with someone altogether is a bit more than a starter marriage. At least it was ended on good terms, and I share the blame with her despite her actions. No body wants a broke nice guy. :p
     

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