1. Andrejs Brivulis

    Andrejs Brivulis New Member

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    Graphic novel set in the 60’s

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Andrejs Brivulis, Jul 14, 2019.

    Hi!

    I’ve been wanting to make a graphic novel that would be set in the 60’s.
    I still don’t know what I could make it about.
    One idea is for it to be a detective story, drawn in sort of a film noir style.
    I really like mid-century modernism and wanted to also incorporate that in the story as places that show up.
    But again - not sure what could the detective story be about.
    The story really could be about anything and I mainly want to make this novel because of my love for the 60’s - the culture movements, the architecture, the lifestyle.
    I would be happy if anyone would have any ideas for such a story and maybe some noteworthy things that happened in that time that a story could be built around.
     
  2. Spurs06

    Spurs06 Member

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    Looking for a 60’s event that’s hasn’t been over used in the detective story. One that stood out was Woodstock. What about a story were a fictional band (as famous as the Beatles )are being pick off one by one, leading up to a final at Woodstock. Somewhere amongst the thousands of people is the killer.
     
  3. GrJs

    GrJs Active Member

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    You need to pick your genres. Film noir is quite a dramatic style, it lends itself well to crime/drama stories. If you want a personal element you can make it crime/tragedy. Mixing film noir with music festival, as Spurs06 has suggested, might prove a good challenge, especially in the stoner-flower power era. However, finding the killer in a crowd of thousands with 60's technology would be impossible unless they left very specific personal clues and were connected to the band personally rather than being a random fan. A story like that will, in my opinion, rely far too much on Sherlock Holmes types of fixes. The kind that are impossible to actually happen.

    You also need to find your own story to write. You have your setting, your character archetype and the visual style but your story has to be all you. Murder mystery easily fits in with your visual style, however, if you wanted a more challenging project you could try an Ocean's 11, 12 & 13-esque type of story but from the perspective of the detective trying to find the thief. Going with the latter suggestion, I'd not make it a group heist but a lone serial thief as it allows for more intimacy between the characters.

    The last bit about noteworthy events is research you should be doing yourself so you can write the story that you want. Otherwise I'd suggest looking for a collaborator to write the story and you draw the story. That research will help you find your story as well.
     
  4. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

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    Which part of the sixties did you have in mind, Kennedy era or psychedelic? Early sixties and late sixties were as different in style and political atmosphere as other eras that were decades apart, and either might lend itself to noir. Skinny ties and fedoras is no-brainer fodder for mid-century cold war spycraft noir, of course, while tie-dye brights mixed with Frank Miller blacks could be a very beautiful thing. The color contrast and genre juxtaposition might make for a unique read. Try a traditional(ish) Philip Marlo style story set in the Hiet Ashbury scene, maybe something to do with a disappearance. Parents are looking for their runaway teen. The jaded schmuck MC assumes she's melted into the San Francisco street scene (a seedier thing below the surface than people realize, with hippies stealing, prostituting and ODing in the same circles as the flower power anti-establishment you see on camera.) Instead, he finds she's been swallowed up by a Charles Manson or Jim Jones style cult! (Both emerged directly from the California hippie scene.)

    That's just an example, but you're welcome to use it. If not, what are some stories you love? "Write what you know" often means "write the type of stories with which you're familiar." You don't want to rip off existing works, obviously, but the type of plot you want should be at least partially informed by the plots you enjoy yourself.
     
  5. Thundair

    Thundair Contributor Contributor

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    Not to be the dark stain on your writing, but maybe you should consider another avenue of creative release.
    I'm not saying to quit writing, but a novel is a lot of work that requires a particular skill set, and one of them is imagination. Your question puts that ability in question.
    If this view of reality is too harsh, message me and I will remove it.
     
  6. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

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    I disagree. Mostly. It's entirely possible that you just need to figure out how to write your stories. There are plenty of methods employed by amateurs and pros alike. Different approaches work for different writers. My stories just occur to me, and sometimes they turn into plots with well-developed characters and conflict, sometimes they go nowhere. We won't know how well this method serves me until I attempt to publish. Plenty of writers, many successful, start with no more premise than what you described in your post. You just need to know the next step. I always focus on concept first, because that's what I have to start. I build characters and a world around my idea for a plot, but if you don't have a plot idea, start where many others start, with either a character or a conflict. I'm no expert on these approaches, but a lot of people on this forum could give excellent advice on building from there. Search for threads like yours, and you'll find volumes on the subject. Also search Google or Bing for writing advice, world building, character development, etc. You'll find articles and blogs galore. Many successful writers are extremely formulaic in their approach, so don't be afraid to "color by numbers," especially while starting out. Maybe you'll get the hang of it, maybe you won't, but if you quit because you're not sure what to write, you've failed before even trying.
     
  7. Thundair

    Thundair Contributor Contributor

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    Now that I’m back on my medication and while I still remember the 60s, I have a few suggestions.
    First, the girls around me wanted sex as bad as I did, which was a good thing for a while.
    Second, everyone I knew was going to cut a record. I still remember when Capital came to hear us in the puke and moan club, and we thought we had made it.
    Third, there were drugs to get you up and drugs to bring you down. I started my week of two Benzedrine on Monday. By Friday, I was taking ten pills to make it through the day. On the way home was beer and once in my apartment I lit a joint and laid back until the bennys wore off.
    All the while we were racing cars with racy women. other than that it was a pretty normal life.
    So if your story has those there things in it; sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll you’ve got the sixties.
     

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