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Idioms from around the world

Discussion in 'Research' started by S A Lee, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Malisky

    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    Oops. Just saw that. Maybe you're right.
     
  2. K McIntyre

    K McIntyre New Member

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    In Hawaii, that same sign means to chill out, all is OK
     
  3. Vandor76

    Vandor76 Contributing Member

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    A Hungarian one:
    Uncertain like the dog's dinner after the lights are turned off = won't happen
     
  4. A.M. Rousso

    A.M. Rousso New Member

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    I know Greek idioms and they are already posted.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  5. A.M. Rousso

    A.M. Rousso New Member

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    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
    I laughed so hard with these! My favorite Greek after the translation is the last one!
    I'm Greek by the way...
     
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  6. Malisky

    Malisky Fuzz Overdriver Contributor

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    Heard a new Korean I liked:

    "You meet your enemy at a one-way road."
     
  7. Pinkymcfiddle

    Pinkymcfiddle Active Member

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    There's an old saying in Tennessee—I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee—that says, fool me once, shame on, shame on you. Fool me—you can't get fooled again.
     
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  8. OurJud

    OurJud Contributing Member Contributor

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    English, but possibly not unheard of elsewhere.

    'All talk and no trousers' - One who boasts but is unable to deliver.

    'Argue the toss' - Refusal to accept a decision.

    'Bent as a nine bob note' - No such note ever existed, thus the person is untrustworthy or corrupt.

    'Black as Newgate's Knocker' - a bad situation (Newgate - a notorious prison so it's (door) knocker spelt trouble)

    Grabbed from: https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/country/british+english.html
     
  9. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Unanimity requires compliance Contributor

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  10. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me (?)

    1/ I've heard this as All mouth and trousers.

    I think the point about the trousers (as opposed to no trousers) is that what's in your trousers could merely be something in your trousers, and not the real you.

    2/ Insert whatever denomination of imaginary money you fancy; note, the fourpenny piece DOES exist...in Maundy money,
     
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  11. Pinkymcfiddle

    Pinkymcfiddle Active Member

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    It's a Bushism.
     
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  12. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Unanimity requires compliance Contributor

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    Yup

     
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  13. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    I thought only lithuanians use this one.

    To smoke the eyes - To deceive somebody
    To poke the eyes - To be in a clear, visible place / To shame
    To shred the eyes - To nag / To reproach cheekily
    To shepherd the eyes - To admire some sight
    Eye to eye - Face to face
    To climb to the eyes - To be insistent/intrusive
    Flay oneself out - make every effort
    To lose a head - to rush
    Raining cats and dogs - very strong rain
    When Pigs fly - something that won't happen ever
    One hand washes another - to support people in dirty works
    To sit under a wing - to be watched over, taken care of
     
  14. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    All common in English. Although it's usually "Pigs might fly", in response to "I'm going to be president", or some other similarly unlikely statement.

    As I recall, "One hand washes another" is used in the musical Chicago - although it's possibly only in the film version. And it means that both parties will benefit from the support, and without any suggestion of dirty works.
     
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  15. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    Maybe in Chicago " one hand washes another " means that, but here the meaning is different. I don't really know which idioms English speaking countries uses, simply I wrote the ones that we often use.
    Okay, what about these:
    Why are you sitting here like a broad in a turnips?
    Neither to the fence nor to the stake ( it's something like neither here nor there, but I don't know how to translate this correctly ).
    Put your teeth on the shelf.
     
  16. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    1/ The musical Chicago. Made into a film starring Renee Zellweger and Catherine Zeta-Jones.

    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/one+hand+washes+the+other+(and+both+wash+the+face)

    2/ Never heard them!

    But Why are you sitting here like a broad in a turnips?... a broad what? Or do you mean a prostitute?...and a (singular) turnips (plural)??? or do you mean a turnip's (possessive)? In which case, what is the noun that is possessed by the turnip? Presumably the meaning is you're just sitting there feeling sorry for yourself. A bit like Why are you standing there with your arse in your hand?
     
  17. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    Broad - old woman, or something like that ( is this word correct? ); turnips plurar. It means, for example, someone is sitting on a bench, coutch, etc., you tell them " hey, move a little, you're sitting like a broad ( old woman; ) in a turnips ( means you have no place to sit, because they are taking all the space ). In English this sounds very odd, but in lithuanian we are used to it, our grandmothers say that all the time.

    By the way, to put teeth on a shelf means that if you don't have money (spend all of them for e.g.), then you have nothing to eat, so you might as well put them on the shelf.
     
  18. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Unanimity requires compliance Contributor

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    "Broad" = prostitute where you're from? To a midwestern American, it's simply a slightly outdated word for "woman". More recent than "dame", my dad used it interchangeably with "gal", but he's in his seventies now, so it's probably very slightly offensive, but I never connected it to sex work.

    Oh no, my dad's life becomes clearer now:

     
  19. Shadowfax

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    You're right, not quite up to speed on my 'Murrican! Although I always got the feeling that it was derogatory.

    Makes the original, ...sitting like a broad in turnips(no article)...more comprehensible. But, why turnips? Are Lithuanian benches somehow designed to resemble turnips? Or are Lithuanian old women famous for sitting in a field of turnips?
     
  20. Rani99

    Rani99 Member

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    I don't know why turnips, it's not like it would be our national food. It would be more understandable if they would sit in a field of potatos.
     
  21. in2media67

    in2media67 New Member

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    if brains were shit you'd be constipated = your stupid
    the best part of you ran down your mothers leg
    dont do as i do, do as i say

    my father
     

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