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  1. Masked Mole

    Masked Mole Senior Member

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    Live Readings

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Masked Mole, Apr 28, 2017.

    Have you ever done a live reading of your work before? If so, what was your experience like?
    My experiences have been really wonderful. I actually got a bit emotional during one of them, because I realized how vulnerable the piece was. I really enjoy the rare opportunities to "perform" my work with the inflection and tone that I always imagined. I have received the most genuine and deep compliments from these events as well.
     
  2. NigeTheHat

    NigeTheHat Contributor Contributor

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    Some, kinda. I write short stories, mostly, and rewrite them for being spoken as opposed to read before I do it. I really enjoy it, actually - more so than the actual writing.
     
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  3. Midge23

    Midge23 Active Member

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    Morning (at least where I am!),

    What sort of changes do you make for the spoken word, rather than the read?

    I belong to a writing group where the writer reads their work aloud. I've always wondered if, when you are looking for critique to improve the work, something gets lost by it not being read on the page.

    Anyway, I'd be interested to know what you do as I don't make any adjustments. I also find it terrifying to read anything aloud, although if it goes down well it is a huge buzz.

    So, in answer to the OP, I haven't done a live reading in the way you have: a performance of a finished piece. Just live readings for critique.

    Dave
     
  4. Alex R. Encomienda

    Alex R. Encomienda Contributor Contributor

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    I've done readings in writing workshop classes before but it was odd; my voice cracked. It wasn't because my writing was that good, I'm pretty sure my writing was something like shit back then. My voice cracked and deepened because I was nervous. Reading (or even speaking) out loud makes me an anxious mess.

    It's unfortunate too because I recently got published in a journal that's doing a reading next month but it's going to be in Paris so even if I was game, I wouldn't be able to make it.
     
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  5. matwoolf

    matwoolf Banned Contributor

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    The worst part is the disabling adrenaline rush, a physical reaction, when you finish & step from the podium, or the stage. Claps at your back, and why 'professionals' retreat behind a curtain, but for ten minutes, from my experience, one endures tremors to the hands and face, a total lack of concentration, or empathy for any of the worm audience. The narrator - messianic, faraway in dribble, people say

    'Great stuff, mate.'

    or

    'I really enjoyed your performance,'

    and you've read a haiku about snow on a twig. It is ridiculous, disproportionate, revealing an egomania most ugly..
     
  6. GB reader

    GB reader Contributor Contributor

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    I am also interested, any light on the subject writing for live read?
    I used to read a lot for my children, they liked it and we read until they were 10-12 years old, so it wasn't only children's books.
     
  7. Masked Mole

    Masked Mole Senior Member

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    As much as I've enjoyed live readings, I have to agree that sometimes it's very nerve-wracking. It's changed my voice a bit too, which is frustrating. I try to drink water beforehand.
    Congratulations on being published. Maybe you can Skype yourself into that Paris meeting. :)
     
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  8. NigeTheHat

    NigeTheHat Contributor Contributor

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    For me, a story designed to be read is more formal.

    When I'm speaking, it'll become something like:

    And so Tristan creeps into the clearing, shield like this [mime holding up a shield], sword like this [mime holding up a sword] and he sees this girl just sitting there, back to him, and he creeps one step, two. Now some warriors would mock him for stalking a woman like she was an army, but Tristan had met Merlyn and anyone who'd met Merlyn knew that sometimes when you were approaching a smiling woman an entire shield wall wasn't enough.

    So he's creeping one step after another [mime this] and this girl with the harp she doesn't even look at him, she just says "You still can't sneak up on me."
     
  9. Alex R. Encomienda

    Alex R. Encomienda Contributor Contributor

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    Thanks for that, I almost forgot we lived in a world where that's actually possible hahaha ;)
     
  10. Midge23

    Midge23 Active Member

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    I understand now. It becomes something quite distinct from writing meant to be read.

    I'm not sure I would agree with a story that is designed to be read being more formal; I think that depends on the style. But your example is more natural for a story that is being told. I think it's the way we would tell a story around the campfire, where the storyteller is perhaps as important as the story itself.

    I need a beer or two in my belly to pull it off!
     

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