1. LittleRedPrius

    LittleRedPrius New Member

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    Music in Screenplay

    Discussion in 'Scripts' started by LittleRedPrius, Nov 13, 2019.

    Before I start, just want to mention that I know traditionally you would not recommend or add music into your writing. There's more that goes into it than just saying "use this song." My question is a little different, though.

    I couldn't seem to find anyone else who had a similar question online.

    I would like to have musical moments in my script where a character (any character) might pick up a guitar and play a tune. In my script, music can save your sanity. It's important for any and all characters, but more importantly some of my main characters, that these moments are present in their lives.

    Here's the issue: There's no lyrics, and I don't play guitar. I can't add tabs for music that I've created. And I can't exactly recommend a guitar cover for an existing song, as that would raise issues with copyright and such as stated before.

    How do I keep the "1-page-1-minute" idea, considering all I can really write would be "He plays a tune on the guitar," or something along those lines.

    I know it's very specific. Any help would be appreciated. Until then, I'll be writing!
     
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  2. Malisky

    Malisky Malkatorean Contributor

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    Hello there!

    The page 1-1-minute idea is a rough guide in any script. If you are a script writer, just place the scene where the character plays the tune and then it's up to the director and the music director to place the music in (and determine how long this scene will be).

    You can go as far and explain the "feeling of the tune" if it's relevant to the story's mood in the script. If you get to meet the director, he might even listen to your proposals if you have any upon the music style. As a screenwriter though, this is the last of your concerns usually.
     
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  3. OzeeManDias

    OzeeManDias Member

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    Something I think is also fairly prudent to ask yourself is something that was mentioned in a prior response and was also something that was alluded to by yourself: What is the music in a given scenario intending to convey?

    Is it conveying an emotion? Is it meant to enhance a particular sensation? I appreciate that you're using music as more than just a way to score a scene, but when that is being done, it's even more critical that the music is used in such a way that emotes itself, much in the same way a character would emote.

    I will freely admit that I'm not a screenwriter, so my take might not be as worthwhile as others, but speaking as both a fan of movies and a fan of music, I'm intrigued by the idea you're presenting.
     
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  4. LittleRedPrius

    LittleRedPrius New Member

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    Great! That's super helpful. I kind of figured it would simply be a matter of leaving the length of the scene up to the director(s). Thanks.

    You hit the nail on the head. It's a developing idea, regardless. As for my intentions at this moment, the reaction from each character will vary. Some might use it as a moment for inspiration, reflection, or maybe just enjoying the music and forgetting about their troubles.

    Anything that humans in everyday life would use music for, just amplified. In a setting where it's not as simple as pulling up iTunes and playing your favorite tune, music is more valued, for the limited amount of times that it's present in a character's life.
     
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