1. Ravilla

    Ravilla New Member

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    Mythology

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Ravilla, Dec 23, 2016.

    Hey there everyone. I am just looking for some suggestions on what you would use or have used when researching mythologies. I'm mainly focused right now on some sort of timeline for them, like what mythology is the earliest and what ones came after leading up to modern times. I know this is a very board subject, so I am looking for what you all think is the best way to research this? Google, Wikipedia, books, some other sites that focus on the subject?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. antlad

    antlad Banned

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    Extremely broad topic. All of the above, plus more. I would focus on what the mythology focused on, or what areas. Popular mythology? Well known? Nature based? Man based?
    Every culture and region has mythologies that have all evolved over time.
    What might help, read Carl Jung's part of Man & His Symbols, the rest of it is his stuff rehashed, IMO. It focuses on a few things, including common belief systems through time.
     
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  3. StoryArcs

    StoryArcs New Member

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    That's a challenge and a half! I would check to see if it's necessary to compile that information first. Is it really worth the time? It sounds like a subject academics would argue over - which myths came before others, especially within a culture as the origin of myths could be hard to pinpoint. But I'm sure you can find a book on world mythologies that could give you the broad strokes. A simple library search will do, maybe even Wikipedia. At least, you'll get an appreciation for how dating mythologies is challenging work.
     
  4. the_ipbanker

    the_ipbanker New Member

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    Google is the best place to start these days. However, once get a few links or ideas of where to start I would head over to Wikipedia and read that. However, if you really want to dig deep look into the references on those Wikipedia pages. You may find some patterns and common references. If you see the same reference cited for different mythologies. I would look into those sites and books more.

    I hope that helps.
     
  5. amerrigan

    amerrigan Active Member

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  6. newjerseyrunner

    newjerseyrunner Contributor Contributor

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    Carl Sagan talked about it a little bit.
     
  7. pensmightierthanthesword

    pensmightierthanthesword Member

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    I personally use them all. I like to read books, articles, websites, watch documentaries (you can find online or on Netflix). My public library has a program where you can borrow ebooks and audio books and have them sent right to your smart device. Visit your library. Bring a shoulder bag with your writing supplies, sit down with some good music, and take notes. Google Scholar is a good site to try and Internet Archives has a lot of public domain materials you can check out for free.
     
  8. Youssef Salameh

    Youssef Salameh Senior Member

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    The Iliad great epic that's written by Homer may be an example for writing such stories.
    It shows lets the reader learn how to use myths in his stories. The old Greek books contain such examples. :)
     
  9. Pipersong

    Pipersong New Member

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    If you really need every mythology in order then just use Wikipedia or something, it'll give an OK estimation. Generally different mythologies will arise from different regions. Even if Greek Gods were huge in Greece, Japan had no such belief's in Zeus. Rather than looking to the order in which they appear, I'd look towards the specific area you want to view the mythologies for, and which other religions from neighboring countries will get in the way. So if your myth of choice is Greek, then you can probably rule out needing Aztec gods. Unless of course you are writing something huge and spanning across time... In which case I guess this has all been pretty pointless, sorry.
     

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