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  1. Chroa

    Chroa New Member

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    Query Letter Novel Query Order

    Discussion in 'Query & Cover Letter Critique' started by Chroa, Jan 1, 2015.

    I'm new to the world of novel writing, though I've been writing screenplays (feature and television) for several years now.

    I've written my novel, and gotten it to a good place - good enough to start thinking about sending it out. However, I've been doing research, and I'm confused when it comes to writing the query letter.

    I understand all the elements that go into a novel query letter. But for every example posted online where the author introduced the title/word count/genre first, there's another where the author dove straight into the hook and/or mini-synopsis right after 'Dear....'.

    Does it matter if I give the title, genre, and length first, or have it come after the story summary? Or is it more of a personal judgment call?

    When I'm writing query letters for screenplays, I always introduced it first before giving the logline, as there's a good consensus on doing so. But there's no consensus I've found for novel queries.

    What are your thoughts?
     
  2. BayView

    BayView Huh. Interesting. Contributor

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    I don't think it matters.

    My personal preference is to put it at the end, because it's pretty boring, but I've seen people do well with queries that have it at the start, as well. Whatever flows best, I'd say.
     
  3. Chroa

    Chroa New Member

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    Thanks. That's kind of what I had come to think, but I wanted to get opinions before I sent my letters out.

    I'll try it with the info after the hook/synopsis, and see how that works.
     
  4. Kat Hawthorne

    Kat Hawthorne New Member

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    Follow the submission guidelines. If the house (or agent or whatever) has a preference, they will say so in their guidelines. If they don't specify, do it how you like. Personally, I like to hook the reader first, but I have seen many others who prefer it the other way around. Either way, get the pertinent information in there somehow. You have a 50/50 chance of being right.
     

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